Mars Ocean Hypothesis

The Mars ocean hypothesis states that nearly a third of the surface of Mars was covered by an ocean of liquid water early in the planet’s geologic history. This primordial ocean, dubbed Oceanus Borealis, would have filled the Vastitas Borealis basin in the northern hemisphere, a region which lies 4–5 km (2.5–3 miles) below the mean planetary elevation, at a time period of approximately 3.8 billion years ago. Evidence for this ocean includes geographic features resembling ancient shorelines, and the chemical properties of the Martian soil and atmosphere. Early Mars would have required a denser atmosphere and warmer climate to allow liquid water to remain at the surface.

Read more about Mars Ocean Hypothesis:  Observational Evidence, Alternate Explanations, See Also

Other articles related to "mars ocean hypothesis, ocean, mars":

Water On Mars - Extinct Water Bodies - Mars Ocean Hypothesis
... The Mars Ocean Hypothesis proposes that the Vastitas Borealis basin was the site of an ocean of liquid water at least once, and presents evidence that nearly a third of the surface of Mars ... This ocean, dubbed Oceanus Borealis, would have filled the Vastitas Borealis basin in the northern hemisphere, a region which lies 4–5 km (2.5–3 ... shoreline', can be traced all around Mars except through the Tharsis volcanic region ...
Mars Ocean Hypothesis - See Also
... Extraterrestrial liquid water Life on Mars Water on Mars. ...

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