Manual Driving Technique

Manual Driving Technique

A manual transmission, also known as a manual gearbox or standard transmission (informally, a manual, n-speed ("n" = number of forward gears, i.e., 4-speed with overdrive, 4-speed, 5-speed, etc.) or standard, stick-shift, straight shift, straight or straight drive (U.S.)) is a type of transmission used in motor vehicle applications. It uses a driver-operated clutch engaged and disengaged by a foot pedal (automobile) or hand lever (motorcycle), for regulating torque transfer from the engine to the transmission; and a gear stick operated by foot (motorcycle) or by hand (automobile).

A conventional, 5-speed manual transmission is often the standard equipment in a base-model car; other options include automated transmissions such as an automatic transmission (often a manumatic), a semi-automatic transmission, or a continuously variable transmission (CVT).

Read more about Manual Driving Technique:  Overview, Unsynchronized Transmission, Synchronized Transmission, Clutch, Applications and Popularity, Truck Transmissions, Maintenance

Other articles related to "manual driving technique, driving, manual":

Manual Driving Technique - Maintenance
... inexperienced drivers, and aggressive driving can lead to more frequent repair or replacement ... Manual transmissions are lubricated with gear oil or engine oil in some cars, which must be changed periodically in some cars, although not as frequently as the automatic ...

Famous quotes containing the words technique, manual and/or driving:

    A successful social technique consists perhaps in finding unobjectionable means for individual self-assertion.
    Eric Hoffer (1902–1983)

    Language ought to be the joint creation of poets and manual workers.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)

    As it grew darker, I was startled by the honking of geese flying low over the woods, like weary travellers getting in late from Southern lakes, and indulging at last in unrestrained complaint and mutual consolation. Standing at my door, I could hear the rush of their wings; when, driving toward my house, they suddenly spied my light, and with hushed clamor wheeled and settled in the pond. So I came in, and shut the door, and passed my first spring night in the woods.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)