Madison (cycling) - History - The Name Madison and Madison Cycle Racing

The Name Madison and Madison Cycle Racing

A lodge had been built three years after James Madison's death in a critical spot at the then-northernmost departure and arrival point in New York City — and named Madison Cottage in honor of the recently deceased fourth president. The site of Madison Cottage would remain a critical crossroads throughout the city's history — after its demise the site gave rise to a park, in turn named Madison Square, which remains today. Madison Square in turn, gave rise to the names of Madison Avenue and Madison Square Garden, the latter taking the name of its original location: adjacent to Madison Square. The race that would become known as the "Madison" was developed at the second Madison Square Garden, which stood on the site of the original Garden. Both Gardens were prominent cycling venues, which gave rise to the track cycle racing that ultimately carried their name — and thereby became an indirect tribute to James Madison.

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