Loyola College in Maryland - Student Life

Student Life

Loyola's undergraduate body is composed of 3,580 students as of 2008. The racial diversity of the undergraduate student body was 85.0% white, 2.7% Asian, 5.1% black, and 3.4% Hispanic. Ninety-eight percent of freshmen and 81% of all undergraduate students live in college housing.

Loyola has more than 150 clubs and organizations, catering to a range of interests. The college operates a television station, WLOY TV; and a radio station, WLOY on 1620 kHz AM. The Greyhound is Loyola's student-run newspaper. Loyola is also host to an annual Relay for Life event, raising $150,000 in 2007. ALANA (African, Latino, Asian and Native American) Student Services provides an array of activities to foster the academic, cultural, personal, spiritual, and leadership development of ALANA students, as well as create and maintain an environment of respect and awareness.

Loyola's ROTC is an elective course taken along with a student’s required college courses. Students take one class and one lab each week, plus physical fitness training three times per week. Courses cover everything from the structure of the Army to military operations and tactics. Upon completion of the program, cadets are commissioned as officers in the U.S. Army and must complete a period of service in either the Active Duty, Army Reserve or Army National Guard. Since its inception in 1952, the ROTC program has commissioned more than 1,100 cadets. Loyola's Army ROTC program has a partnership with Towson University, the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, and Goucher College.

More than half of the student population has participated in some community service activity during their time at Loyola. The Center for Community Service and Justice engages students by developing service opportunities in a wide variety of areas. The center offers nearly 40 ongoing community service programs, more than 15 one-time service opportunities throughout the year, and several immersion programs. Students also have an opportunity to become involved through service learning, which pairs community service with academic coursework.

Sixty-five percent of Loyola's undergraduate students studied abroad during their junior year. Students can choose from 21 different programs, exchanges, and affiliations in 16 countries.

  • Loyola-sponsored programs include Alcala, Spain; Auckland, New Zealand; Bangkok, Thailand; Beijing, China; Cork, Ireland; Leuven, Belgium; Melbourne, Australia; Newcastle, England; Paris, France; and Rome, Italy.
  • Programs are available for all majors, and students have the option of going for one semester or the entire year. Some programs are taught in English, some in the native language, and some a combination of both.
  • Eighty-one percent of Loyola students study abroad, placing it 10tn on U.S. News & World Report's "Most students studying abroad" listing.

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