Lowering Blood Pressure in A Natural Way - Eating Dark Chocolate

Famous quotes containing the words dark, chocolate, eating, lowering, blood, pressure and/or natural:

    While I wrought out these fitful Danaan rhymes,
    My heart would brim with dreams about the times
    When we bent down above the fading coals
    And talked of the dark folk who live in souls
    Of passionate men, like bats in the dead trees....
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    The man who invented Eskimo Pie made a million dollars, so one is told, but E.E. Cummings, whose verse has been appearing off and on for three years now, and whose experiments should not be more appalling to those interested in poetry than the experiment of surrounding ice-cream with a layer of chocolate was to those interested in soda fountains, has hardly made a dent in the doughy minds of our so-called poetry lovers.
    John Dos Passos (1896–1970)

    The boys and girls are one tonight.
    They unbutton blouses. They unzip flies.
    They take off shoes. They turn off the light.
    The glimmering creatures are full of lies.
    They are eating each other. They are overfed.
    At night, alone, I marry the bed.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    Science is a dynamic undertaking directed to lowering the degree of the empiricism involved in solving problems; or, if you prefer, science is a process of fabricating a web of interconnected concepts and conceptual schemes arising from experiments and observations and fruitful of further experiments and observations.
    James Conant (1893–1978)

    The land cannot be cleansed of the blood that is shed therein, but by the blood of him that shed it.
    Bible: Hebrew Numbers 35:33.

    Amid the pressure of great events, a general principle gives no help.
    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831)

    What journeyings on foot and on horseback through the wilderness, to preach the gospel to these minks and muskrats! who first, no doubt, listened with their red ears out of a natural hospitality and courtesy, and afterward from curiosity or even interest, till at length there “were praying Indians,” and, as the General Court wrote to Cromwell, the “work is brought to this perfection that some of the Indians themselves can pray and prophesy in a comfortable manner.”
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)