London Congestion Charge

The London congestion charge is a fee charged on most motor vehicles operating within the Congestion Charge Zone (CCZ) in central London between 07:00 and 18:00 (Monday-Friday only). The charge, which was introduced on 17 February 2003, remains one of the largest congestion zones in the world despite the cancellation of the Western Extension which operated between February 2007 and January 2011. The charge aims to reduce congestion, and to raise investment funds for London's transport system.

The standard charge is £10 for each day, for each non-exempt vehicle that travels within the zone with a penalty of between £60 and £187 levied for non-payment. Enforcement is primarily based on automatic number plate recognition (ANPR). Transport for London (TfL) is responsible for the charge which has been operated by IBM since 1 November 2009.

Read more about London Congestion ChargeEffects, Operations and Technology, Income and Costs

Other articles related to "london congestion charge, congestion charge, charges":

London Congestion Charge - Income and Costs
... TfL's annual report for 2006–7 shows that revenues from the congestion charge were £252.4m over the financial year, representing 8.5% of TfL's ... Once other charges were deducted, the congestion charge brought in an annual operating net income of £89.1m for TfL ... The initial operating revenues from the congestion charge did not reach the levels that were originally expected ...

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