Little White Tern

The Little White Tern or Little Fairy Tern (Gygis alba microrhyncha) is a subspecies of tern (family Sternidae). It is sometimes considered a distinct species most closely related to the larger White Tern. It is found in French Polynesia and Kiribati.

Other articles related to "white, whites":

Yellow-browed Bunting
... are brown and heavily streaked, and the underparts are white with an orange hue on the flanks and some fine dark streaks ... The breeding male has a black head with white crown and moustachial stripes and throat ... however, there is always some yellow in the eyebrow, as well as at least a hint of a white stripe on the crown ...
Deer - Cultural Significance - Literature and Art
... In the Disney film Bambi, he is a white-tailed deer, while in Felix Salten's original book Bambi, A Life in the Woods, he is a roe deer ... of Narnia series, the adult Pevensies, now kings and queens of Narnia, chase the White Stag on a hunt, as the Stag is said to grant its captor a wish ... The Animals of Farthing Wood, a deer called The Great White Stag is the leader of all the animal residents of the nature reserve White Deer Park ...
White Trash
... White trash is an American English pejorative term referring to poor white people in the United States, especially in the rural South, suggesting lower social class ... The term is usually a slur, but may also be used self-referentially by whites to jokingly describe their origins ...
White Trash - In Literature
... Evelyn Greenleaf Sutherland's play Po' White Trash, published in 1900, exposes complicated cultural tensions in the post-Reconstruction South, at the ... on the Suwanee (1948) explores images of 'white trash' women ... of class and gender identities among poor whites reflects the eugenics discourses of the 1920s ...

Famous quotes containing the word white:

    Mysterious Night! when our first parent knew
    Thee from report divine, and heard thy name,
    Did he not tremble for this lovely frame,
    This glorious canopy of light and blue?
    —Joseph Blanco White (1775–1841)