List of U.S. Place Names of Spanish Origin

List Of U.S. Place Names Of Spanish Origin

As a consequence of former Spanish and, later, Mexican sovereignty over lands that are now part of the United States, there are many places in the country, mostly in the southwest, with names of Spanish origin. Florida, Missouri, and Louisiana also were at times under Spanish control. There are also several places in the United States with Spanish names as a result to other factors.

Read more about List Of U.S. Place Names Of Spanish Origin:  Authenticity and Origin, States, Territories, Counties and Parishes, Regions, Islands, Mountains and Hills, Streets and Roads, Rivers, Springs, Valleys, Bays and Inlets

Famous quotes containing the words list of, origin, spanish, list, place and/or names:

    Modern tourist guides have helped raised tourist expectations. And they have provided the natives—from Kaiser Wilhelm down to the villagers of Chichacestenango—with a detailed and itemized list of what is expected of them and when. These are the up-to- date scripts for actors on the tourists’ stage.
    Daniel J. Boorstin (b. 1914)

    The origin of storms is not in clouds,
    our lightning strikes when the earth rises,
    spillways free authentic power:
    dead John Brown’s body walking from a tunnel
    to break the armored and concluded mind.
    Muriel Rukeyser (1913–1980)

    The hangover became a part of the day as well allowed-for as the Spanish siesta.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    We saw the machinery where murderers are now executed. Seven have been executed. The plan is better than the old one. It is quietly done. Only a few, at the most about thirty or forty, can witness [an execution]. It excites nobody outside of the list permitted to attend. I think the time for capital punishment has passed. I would abolish it. But while it lasts this is the best mode.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    This place is prose.
    Yvonne (b. 1945)

    “Well then, it’s Granny speaking: ‘I dunnow!
    Mebbe I’m wrong to take it as I do.
    There ain’t no names quite like the old ones, though,
    Nor never will be to my way of thinking.
    One mustn’t bear too hard on the newcomers,
    But there’s a dite too many of them for comfort....’”
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)