List of Television Stations in Latin America

List Of Television Stations In Latin America

This is a list of Latin American television stations.

Read more about List Of Television Stations In Latin America:  Latin American Cable and Satellite Channels, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Falkland Islands, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republica Dominicana, Uruguay, Venezuela

Other articles related to "list of television stations in latin america":

List Of Television Stations In Latin America - Venezuela
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    Thirty—the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    Latin America is very fond of the word “hope.” We like to be called the “continent of hope.” Candidates for deputy, senator, president, call themselves “candidates of hope.” This hope is really something like a promise of heaven, an IOU whose payment is always being put off. It is put off until the next legislative campaign, until next year, until the next century.
    Pablo Neruda (1904–1973)

    Nature in America has always been suspect, on the defensive, cannibalized by progress. In America, every specimen becomes a relic.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933)

    But these young scholars, who invade our hills,
    Bold as the engineer who fells the wood,
    And travelling often in the cut he makes,
    Love not the flower they pluck, and know it not
    And all their botany is Latin names.
    The old men studied magic in the flowers.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Thirty—the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    The television screen, so unlike the movie screen, sharply reduced human beings, revealed them as small, trivial, flat, in two banal dimensions, drained of color. Wasn’t there something reassuring about it!—that human beings were in fact merely images of a kind registered in one another’s eyes and brains, phenomena composed of microscopic flickering dots like atoms. They were atoms—nothing more. A quick switch of the dial and they disappeared and who could lament the loss?
    Joyce Carol Oates (b. 1938)

    A reader who quarrels with postulates, who dislikes Hamlet because he does not believe that there are ghosts or that people speak in pentameters, clearly has no business in literature. He cannot distinguish fiction from fact, and belongs in the same category as the people who send cheques to radio stations for the relief of suffering heroines in soap operas.
    Northrop Frye (b. 1912)