List of Surviving Du Mont Television Network Broadcasts

List Of Surviving Du Mont Television Network Broadcasts

The DuMont Television Network was launched in 1946 and ceased broadcasting in 1956. Allen DuMont, who created the network, preserved most of what it produced in kinescope format; however, many of these were destroyed around 1958 in order to recover the silver content.

By the 1970s, however, the DuMont archive was considered worthless – so much so that all remaining kinescopes and videotapes were loaded into three trucks and dumped into Upper New York Bay. Since then, there has been extensive research on which DuMont programs have episodes extant.

Due to the possibilities that various unknown collectors may be in possession of programs and/or episodes not listed here, and that the sources below may actually hold more than what is listed (for example, through a mislabeled film can), this list is very likely incomplete.

For a list of program series aired on DuMont, see List of programs broadcast by the DuMont Television Network.

Read more about List Of Surviving Du Mont Television Network Broadcasts:  Held By The UCLA Film and Television Archive, Held By The Paley Center For Media, Held By The Museum of Broadcast Communications, Held By The Internet Archive, Held By The Library of Congress, Held By TV4U, Held By Others

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List Of Surviving Du Mont Television Network Broadcasts - Held By Others
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