List of Subjects in Grays Anatomy - XII Surface Anatomy and Surface Markings Surface Anatomy of The Lower Extremity Grays S291 Grays Page

Famous quotes containing the words list of, extremity, page, surface, subjects, list and/or anatomy:

    Feminism is an entire world view or gestalt, not just a laundry list of women’s issues.
    Charlotte Bunch (b. 1944)

    Man’s extremity is God’s opportunity.
    John Flavel (1630–1691)

    There is then creative reading as well as creative writing. When the mind is braced by labor and invention, the page of whatever book we read becomes luminous with manifold allusion. Every sentence is doubly significant, and the sense of our author is as broad as the world.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    All forms of beauty, like all possible phenomena, contain an element of the eternal and an element of the transitory—of the absolute and of the particular. Absolute and eternal beauty does not exist, or rather it is only an abstraction creamed from the general surface of different beauties. The particular element in each manifestation comes from the emotions: and just as we have our own particular emotions, so we have our own beauty.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821–1867)

    Our family talked a lot at table, and only two subjects were taboo: politics and personal troubles. The first was sternly avoided because Father ran a nonpartisan daily in a small town, with some success, and did not wish to express his own opinions in public, even when in private.
    M.F.K. Fisher (1908–1992)

    A man’s interest in a single bluebird is worth more than a complete but dry list of the fauna and flora of a town.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    But a man must keep an eye on his servants, if he would not have them rule him. Man is a shrewd inventor, and is ever taking the hint of a new machine from his own structure, adapting some secret of his own anatomy in iron, wood, and leather, to some required function in the work of the world. But it is found that the machine unmans the user. What he gains in making cloth, he loses in general power.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)