List of Subjects in Grays Anatomy - IV Myology The Fasciae and Muscles of The Trunk The Muscles and Fasciae of The Pelvis Grays S119 Grays Page

Famous quotes containing the words list of, trunk, muscles, page, subjects, list and/or anatomy:

    Do your children view themselves as successes or failures? Are they being encouraged to be inquisitive or passive? Are they afraid to challenge authority and to question assumptions? Do they feel comfortable adapting to change? Are they easily discouraged if they cannot arrive at a solution to a problem? The answers to those questions will give you a better appraisal of their education than any list of courses, grades, or test scores.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)

    through the Sumner Tunnel,
    trunk by trunk through its sulphurous walls,
    tile by tile like a men’s urinal,
    slipping through
    like somebody else’s package.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    Light
    Flashed from his matted head and marble feet,
    He grappled at the net
    With the coiled, hurdling muscles of his thighs:
    The corpse was bloodless, a botch of reds and whites,
    Robert Lowell (1917–1977)

    They who say that women do not desire the right of suffrage, that they prefer masculine domination to self-government, falsify every page of history, every fact in human experience. It has taken the whole power of the civil and canon law to hold woman in the subordinate position which it is said she willingly accepts.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    Conversation ... is like the table of contents of a dull book.... All the greatest subjects of human thought are proudly displayed in it. Listen to it for three minutes, and you ask yourself which is more striking, the emphasis of the speaker or his shocking ignorance.
    Stendhal [Marie Henri Beyle] (1783–1842)

    All is possible,
    Who so list believe;
    Trust therefore first, and after preve,
    As men wed ladies by license and leave,
    All is possible.
    Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503?–1542)

    But a man must keep an eye on his servants, if he would not have them rule him. Man is a shrewd inventor, and is ever taking the hint of a new machine from his own structure, adapting some secret of his own anatomy in iron, wood, and leather, to some required function in the work of the world. But it is found that the machine unmans the user. What he gains in making cloth, he loses in general power.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)