List of State Leaders in 1980 - Africa

Africa

  • Algeria
    • President - Chadli Bendjedid, President of Algeria (1979–1992)
    • Prime Minister - Mohamed Ben Ahmed Abdelghani, Prime Minister of Algeria (1979–1984)
  • Angola
    • Communist Party Leader - José Eduardo dos Santos, Secretary of the Popular Liberation Movement of Angola-Labor Party (1979–1991)
    • President - José Eduardo dos Santos, President of Angola (1979–present)
  • Benin
    • Communist Party Leader - Mathieu Kérékou, Secretary of the Popular Revolutionary Party of Benin (1979–1990)
    • President - Mathieu Kérékou, President of Benin (1972–1991)
  • Botswana
    • President -
      1. Sir Seretse Khama, President of Botswana (1966–1980)
      2. Quett Masire, President of Botswana (1980–1998)
  • Burundi
    • President - Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, President of Burundi (1976–1987)
  • Cameroon
    • President - Ahmadou Ahidjo, President of Cameroon (1960–1982)
    • Prime Minister - Paul Biya, Prime Minister of Cameroon (1975–1982)
  • Cape Verde
    • President - Aristides Pereira, President of Cape Verde (1975–1991)
    • Prime Minister - Pedro Pires, Prime Minister of Cape Verde (1975–1991)
  • Central African Republic
    • President - David Dacko, President of the Central African Republic (1979–1981)
    • Prime Minister -
      1. Bernard Ayandho, Prime Minister of the Central African Republic (1979–1980)
      2. Jean-Pierre Lebouder, Prime Minister of the Central African Republic (1980–1981)
  • Chad
    • Head of State - Goukouni Oueddei, President of the Transitional Government of National Unity of Chad (1979–1982)
  • Comoros
    • President - Ahmed Abdallah, President of the Comoros (1978–1989)
    • Prime Minister - Salim Ben Ali, Prime Minister of the Comoros (1978–1982)
  • Congo
    • Communist Party Leader - Denis Sassou Nguesso, Chairman of the Presidium of the Central Committee of the Congolese Labor Party (1979–1991)
    • President - Denis Sassou Nguesso, President of Congo (1979–1992)
    • Prime Minister - Louis Sylvain Goma, Prime Minister of Congo (1975–1984)
  • Djibouti
    • President - Hassan Gouled Aptidon, President of Djibouti (1977–1999)
    • Prime Minister - Barkat Gourad Hamadou, Prime Minister of Djibouti (1978–2001)
  • Egypt -
    • President - Anwar Sadat, President of Egypt (1970–1981)
    • Prime Minister -
      1. Mustafa Khalil, Prime Minister of Egypt (1978–1980)
      2. Anwar Sadat, Prime Minister of Egypt (1980–1981)
  • Equatorial Guinea
    • Head of State - Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, Chairman of the Supreme Military Council of Equatorial Guinea (1979–present)
  • Ethiopia
    • Head of State - Mengistu Haile Mariam, Chairman of the Coordinating Committee of the Armed Forces of Ethiopia (1977–1991)
  • Gabon
    • President - Omar Bongo, President of Gabon (1967–2009)
    • Prime Minister - Léon Mébiame, Prime Minister of Gabon (1975–1994)
  • The Gambia
    • President - Sir Dawda Jawara, President of The Gambia (1970–1994)
  • Ghana
    • President - Hilla Limann, President of Ghana (1979–1981)
  • Guinea
    • President - Ahmed Sékou Touré, President of Guinea (1958–1984)
    • Prime Minister - Louis Lansana Beavogui, Prime Minister of Guinea (1972–1984)
  • Guinea-Bissau
    • Head of State -
      1. Luís Cabral, Chairman of the Council of State of Guinea-Bissau (1973–1980)
      2. João Bernardo Vieira, Chairman of the Council of the Revolution of Guinea-Bissau (1980–1984)
    • Prime Minister - João Bernardo Vieira, Prime Minister of Guinea-Bissau (1978–1980)
  • Ivory Coast
    • President - Félix Houphouët-Boigny, President of Ivory Coast (1960–1993)
  • Kenya
    • President - Daniel arap Moi, President of Kenya (1978–2002)
  • Lesotho
    • Monarch - Moshoeshoe II, King of Lesotho (1970–1990)
    • Prime Minister - Leabua Jonathan, Prime Minister of Lesotho (1965–1986)
  • Liberia
    • President -
      1. William R. Tolbert, Jr., President of Liberia (1971–1980)
      2. Samuel Doe, President of Liberia (1980–1990)
  • Libya
    • De facto Head of State - Muammar Gaddafi, Guide of the Revolution of Libya (1969–2011)
    • Nominal Head of State - Abdul Ati al-Obeidi, General Secretary of the General People's Congress of Libya (1979–1981)
    • Head of Government - Jadallah Azzuz at-Talhi, General Secretary of the General People's Committee of Libya (1979–1984)
  • Madagascar
    • President - Didier Ratsiraka, President of Madagascar (1975–1993)
    • Prime Minister - Désiré Rakotoarijaona, Prime Minister of Madagascar (1977–1988)
  • Malawi
    • President - Hastings Banda, President for Life of Malawi (1966–1994)
  • Mali
    • President - Moussa Traoré, President of Mali (1968–1991)
  • Mauritania
    • Head of State -
      1. Mohamed Mahmoud Ould Louly, Head of State of Mauritania (1979–1980)
      2. Mohamed Khouna Ould Haidalla, Head of State of Mauritania (1980–1984)
    • Prime Minister -
      1. Mohamed Khouna Ould Haidalla, Prime Minister of Mauritania (1979–1980)
      2. Sid Ahmed Ould Bneijara, Prime Minister of Mauritania (1980–1981)
  • Mauritius
    • Monarch - Elizabeth II, Queen of Mauritius (1968–1992)
    • Governor-General - Sir Dayendranath Burrenchobay, Governor-General of Mauritius (1978–1983)
    • Prime Minister - Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, Prime Minister of Mauritius (1961–1982)
  • Mayotte (Territorial collectivity of France)
    • Prefect -
      1. Jean Rigotard, Prefect of Mayotte (1978–1980)
      2. Philippe Jacques Nicolas Kessler, Prefect of Mayotte (1980–1981)
    • President of the General Council - Younoussa Bamana, President of the General Council of Mayotte (1976–1991)
  • Morocco
    • Monarch - Hassan II, King of Morocco (1961–1999)
    • Prime Minister - Maati Bouabid, Prime Minister of Morocco (1979–1983)
    • Western Sahara (self-declared, partially recognized state)
      • President - Mohamed Abdelaziz, President of Western Sahara (1976–present)
      • Prime Minister - Mohamed Lamine Ould Ahmed, Prime Minister of Western Sahara (1976–1982)
  • Mozambique
    • Communist Party Leader - Samora Machel, President of the Liberation Front of Mozambique (1975–1986)
    • President - Samora Machel, President of Mozambique (1975–1986)
  • Niger
    • Head of State - Seyni Kountché, President of the Supreme Military Council of Niger (1974–1987)
  • Nigeria
    • President - Shehu Shagari, President of Nigeria (1979–1983)
  • Rwanda
    • President - Juvénal Habyarimana, President of Rwanda (1973–1994)
  • Saint Helena and Dependencies (British crown colony)
    • Governor - Geoffrey Colin Guy, Governor of Saint Helena (1976–1981)
  • São Tomé and Príncipe
    • President - Manuel Pinto da Costa, President of São Tomé and Príncipe (1975–1991)
  • Senegal
    • President - Léopold Sédar Senghor, President of Senegal (1960–1980)
    • Prime Minister - Abdou Diouf, Prime Minister of Senegal (1970–1980)
  • Seychelles
    • President - France-Albert René, President of Seychelles (1977–2004)
  • Sierra Leone
    • President - Siaka Stevens, President of Sierra Leone (1971–1985)
  • Somalia
    • Communist Party Leader - Siad Barre, Secretary-general of the Somali Revolutionary Socialist Party (1976–1991)
    • President - Siad Barre, President of Somalia (1969–1991)
  • South Africa
    • President - Marais Viljoen, State President of South Africa (1979–1984)
    • Prime Minister - P. W. Botha, Prime Minister of South Africa (1978–1984)
    • South West Africa (League of Nations mandate administered by South Africa)
      • Administrator-General -
        1. Gerrit Viljoen, Administrator-General of South West Africa (1979–1980)
        2. Danie Hough, Administrator-General of South West Africa (1980–1983)
      • Premier - Dirk Mudge, Chairman of the Council of Ministers of South West Africa (1980–1983)
  • Sudan
    • President - Gaafar Nimeiry, President of Sudan (1969–1985)
    • Prime Minister - Gaafar Nimeiry, Prime minister of Sudan (1977–1985)
  • Swaziland
    • Monarch - Sobhuza II, King of Swaziland (1921–1982)
    • Prime Minister - Prince Mabandla Dlamini, Prime Minister of Swaziland (1979–1983)
  • Tanzania
    • President - Julius Nyerere, President of Tanzania (1962–1985)
    • Prime Minister -
      1. Edward Sokoine, Prime Minister of Tanzania (1977–1980)
      2. Cleopa David Msuya, Prime Minister of Tanzania (1980–1983)
  • Togo
    • President - Gnassingbé Eyadéma, President of Togo (1967–2005)
  • Tunisia
    • President - Habib Bourguiba, President for Life of Tunisia (1957–1987)
    • Prime Minister -
      1. Hedi Amara Nouira, Prime Minister of Tunisia (1970–1980)
      2. Mohammed Mzali, Prime Minister of Tunisia (1980–1986)
  • Uganda
    • Head of State -
      1. Godfrey Binaisa, President of Uganda (1979–1980)
      2. Paulo Muwanga, Chairman of Military Commission of Uganda (1980)
      3. Presidential Commission, President of Uganda (1980)
      4. Milton Obote, President of Uganda (1980–1985)
    • Prime Minister - Otema Alimadi, Prime Minister of Uganda (1980–1985)
  • Upper Volta
    • Head of State -
      1. Sangoulé Lamizana, President of Upper Volta (1966–1980)
      2. Saye Zerbo, President of the Military Committee of Recovery for National Progress of Upper Volta (1980–1982)
    • Prime Minister -
      1. Joseph Conombo, Prime Minister of Upper Volta (1978–1980)
      2. Saye Zerbo, Prime Minister of Upper Volta (1980–1982)
  • Zaire
    • President - Mobutu Sese Seko, President of Zaire (1965–1997)
    • Head of Government -
      1. Bo-Boliko Lokonga Monse Mihambo, First State Commissioner of Zaire (1979–1980)
      2. Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond, First State Commissioner of Zaire (1980–1981)
  • Zambia
    • President - Kenneth Kaunda, President of Zambia (1964–1991)
    • Prime Minister - Daniel Lisulo, Prime Minister of Zambia (1978–1981)
  • Zimbabwe
    • Southern Rhodesia gained independence on 18 April 1980
    • Governor - Christopher Soames, Baron Soames, Governor of Southern Rhodesia (1979–1980)
    • President - Canaan Banana, President of Zimbabwe (1980–1987)
    • Prime Minister - Robert Mugabe, Prime Minister of Zimbabwe (1980–1987)

Read more about this topic:  List Of State Leaders In 1980

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Famous quotes containing the word africa:

    Everywhere—all over Africa and South America ... you see these suburbs springing up. They represent the optimum of what people want. There’s a certain sort of logic leading towards these immaculate suburbs. And they’re terrifying, because they are the death of the soul.... This is the prison this planet is being turned into.
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    In Africa I had indeed found a sufficiently frightful kind of loneliness but the isolation of this American ant heap was even more shattering.
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    I thought that when they said Atlantic Charter, that meant me and everybody in Africa and Asia and everywhere. But it seems like the Atlantic is an ocean that does not touch anywhere but North America and Europe.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)