List of South Carolina State Symbols

List Of South Carolina State Symbols

The state of South Carolina has many official state symbols, holidays and designations and they have been selected to represent the history, resources, and possibilities of the state. The palmetto and crescent moon of the state flag is South Carolina's best-known symbol. It is seen on shirts and bumperstickers and is often adapted throughout the state to show support for collegiate teams or interest in particular sports activities.

Read more about List Of South Carolina State Symbols:  Symbols of Sovereignty, List of State Symbols, List of State Holidays and Observances, List of Additional State Designations

Other articles related to "list of south carolina state symbols, south, state":

List Of South Carolina State Symbols - List of Additional State Designations
... The pledge to the flag of South Carolina is "I salute the flag of South Carolina and pledge to the Palmetto State love, loyalty and faith." The South Carolina Botanical Garden at Clemson University is designated the ... The South Carolina Tobacco Museum in Mullins is the official tobacco museum ... The South Carolina Railroad Museum in Winnsboro is the official railroad museum ...

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