List of Raised and Transitional Bogs of Switzerland

This is a list of raised and transitional bogs of Switzerland. It is based on the Federal Inventory of Raised and Transitional Bogs of National Importance. The inventory is part of a 1991 Ordinance of the Swiss Federal Council implementing the Federal Law on the Protection of Nature and Cultural Heritage.

Read more about List Of Raised And Transitional Bogs Of Switzerland:  Inventory of Raised and Transitional Bogs of National Importance

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