List of Presidential Visits To North Dakota - Visits While in Office - Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt visited the state at least four times during his tenure as President. The first, in 1934, was to Devils Lake, North Dakota to view the extensive drought there; 35,000 people were present during his four hour stay. He came to Bismarck in 1936 to view the drought's impact in that area and to hear from farmers who were seeking drought aid. In 1937, Roosevelt came to Grand Forks to dedicate a new fairgrounds grandstand, and he also made several unpublicized visits between 1942 and 1944 to tour military establishments.

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Famous quotes by franklin d. roosevelt:

    Of course we will continue to work for cheaper electricity in the homes and on the farms of America; for better and cheaper transportation; for low interest rates; for sounder home financing; for better banking; for the regulation of security issues; for reciprocal trade among nations and for the wiping out of slums. And my friends, for all of these we have only begun to fight.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    The loneliest feeling in the world is when you think you are leading the parade and turn to find that no one is following you. No president who badly misguesses public opinion will last very long.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    I have come to the conclusion that the closer people are to what may be called the front lines of government ... the easier it is to see the immediate underbrush, the individual tree trunks of the moment, and to forget the nobility the usefulness and the wide extent of the forest itself.... They forget that politics after all is only an instrument through which to achieve Government.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    I am ... willing to make it clear that American foreign policy must uphold the sanctity of international treaties. That is the cornerstone on which all relations between nations must rest.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    Today we seek a moral basis for peace.... It cannot be a lasting peace if the fruit of it is oppression, or starvation, cruelty, or human life dominated by armed camps. It cannot be a sound peace if small nations must live in fear of powerful neighbors. It cannot be a moral peace if freedom from invasion is sold for tribute.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)