List of National Natural Landmarks - Access

Access

Participation in the NNL Program does not carry any requirements regarding public access. The NNL registry does include many sites of national significance that are open for public tours. Some are open, others are not. Since many NNLs are located on federal and state property, permission to visit is often unnecessary. Some private property may be open to public visitation or just require permission from the site manager. On the other hand, some NNL private landowners do not desire any visitors whatsoever and might even prosecute trespassers. The reasons for this viewpoint vary: potential property damage or liability, fragile or dangerous resources, and desire for solitude or no publicity.

Read more about this topic:  List Of National Natural Landmarks

Other articles related to "access":

Access - Other Meanings
... Access control is the ability to permit or deny the use of a particular resource Access (comics), a comic book character Access (economics) Access (group), a ...
Operation Flavius - Examination of MI5 Records
... Andrew, the official historian for the Security Service, was given access to MI5's records to prepare a book for the centenary of the organisation ... Andrew had access to all files created by MI5 since it was founded but was limited in what he could publish ... He was required to enroll in the Security Service in order to be given access to the archives, which drew criticism from some historians and commentators ...
Proxy Server - Uses
... To speed up access to resources (using caching) ... Access enhancement/restriction To apply access policy to network services or content, e.g ... To access sites prohibited or filtered by your ISP or institution ...

Famous quotes containing the word access:

    Lesbian existence comprises both the breaking of a taboo and the rejection of a compulsory way of life. It is also a direct or indirect attack on the male right of access to women.
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    Whilst the rights of all as persons are equal, in virtue of their access to reason, their rights in property are very unequal. One man owns his clothes, and another owns a country.
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    Knowledge in the form of an informational commodity indispensable to productive power is already, and will continue to be, a major—perhaps the major—stake in the worldwide competition for power. It is conceivable that the nation-states will one day fight for control of information, just as they battled in the past for control over territory, and afterwards for control over access to and exploitation of raw materials and cheap labor.
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