List of Mendelian Traits in Humans

List Of Mendelian Traits In Humans

In Mendelian inheritance, a child receiving a dominant allele from either parent will have the dominant form of the trait. Only those that received the recessive allele from both parents present with the recessive phenotype. Those that receive a dominant allele from one parent and a recessive allele from the other parent will have the dominant form of the trait. Purely Mendelian traits are a tiny minority of all traits, since most phenotypic traits exhibit incomplete dominance, codominance, and contributions from many genes.

The recessive phenotype may theoretically skip any number of generations, lying dormant in heterozygous "carrier" individuals until they have children with someone who also has the recessive allele and both pass it on to their child.

Read more about List Of Mendelian Traits In Humans:  Examples, Traits Previously Believed To Be Mendelian

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List Of Mendelian Traits In Humans - Traits Previously Believed To Be Mendelian
... Some traits were previously believed to be Mendelian, but their inheritance is (probably) based on more complex genetic models, possibly involving more than one gene ...

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