List of Major League Baseball Players Named in The Mitchell Report - Mentioned in Connection To Signature Pharmacy (16)

Mentioned in Connection To Signature Pharmacy (16)

Eight current major league players and eight former major league players were mentioned in the media as purchasers of performance enhancing drugs from Signature Pharmacy and several rejuvenation centers. Several online pharmacies (Signature Pharmacy being one of them), anti-aging clinics and doctors that have issued prescriptions for performance-enhancing drugs have been under investigation by federal and state authorities. Mitchell requested the 16 players interview with him, but only José Canseco accepted his offer.

Major League players that were active at the time of the report are listed in bold italics.

Player Mitchell Report allegation Post-report player response
Rick Ankiel In a September 2007 article, the New York Daily News reported that Ankiel received eight shipments of human growth hormone from Signature Pharmacy in 2004. According to the article, Ankiel received a prescription from a doctor at a Florida anti-aging clinic. In September 2007, Ankiel admitted to using HGH, though claimed that he did so legally under a doctor's care. Ankiel met with the Commissioner's Office regarding this situation, and Commissioner Bud Selig did not impose any discipline.
David Bell In a March 2007 article, Sports Illustrated reported that Bell received six shipments of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in 2005 from Applied Pharmacy Services of Alabama. According to the article, Bell received a prescription from an Arizona anti-aging clinic. Bell acknowledged to SI that he received the hCG and stated that they were issued under a valid prescription.
Paul Byrd In an October 2007 article, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Byrd had received at least thirteen shipments of human growth hormone between 2002 and 2005 worth approximately $25,000 from a Florida anti-aging clinic. In response to the article, which was printed the same day that Byrd and the Cleveland Indians played the Boston Red Sox in Game 7 of the 2007 American League Championship Series, Byrd stated that the HGH was legally prescribed for a pituitary disorder (it was later discovered that the prescribing doctor was an unlicensed dentist). Byrd also stated that he had notified Major League Baseball of this condition and that he had received permission to use HGH. Major League Baseball denied receiving such notice and stated that MLB has never given a player permission to use HGH.
José Canseco In a March 2007 article, Sports Illustrated reported that Canseco received shipments of human growth hormone, testosterone, stanozolol, human chorionic gonadotropin, and 340 syringes from Applied Pharmacy Services of Alabama. According to the article, Canseco had received a prescription for these materials from a Florida anti-aging clinic. In a telephone interview with Canseco's attorney, Canseco confirmed these purchases to Mitchell.
Jay Gibbons In a September 2007 article, Sports Illustrated reported that Gibbons received several shipments of human growth hormone, testosterone, and human chorionic gonadotropin from Signature Pharmacy from 2003 to 2005. According to the article, Gibbons received a prescription for these materials from a Florida anti-aging clinic. One of Gibbons' prescribing doctors, Ana Maria Santi, pled guilty to federal and state charges of illegally prescribing performance-enhancing drugs. Gibbons met with the Commissioner's Office regarding this situation, and Commissioner Bud Selig suspended Gibbons for the first 15 days of the 2008 season. After receiving the suspension, Gibbons acknowledged and apologized for his use of performance-enhancing drugs.
Troy Glaus In a September 2007 article, Sports Illustrated reported that Glaus received shipments of nandrolone and testosterone from Signature Pharmacy from 2003 to 2004. According to the article, Glaus had received a prescription for these materials from a California anti-aging clinic. One of Glaus' prescribing doctors, Ramon Scruggs, had his medical license suspended for making illegal prescriptions. Glaus met with the Commissioner's Office regarding this situation, and Commissioner Bud Selig did not impose any discipline.
Jason Grimsley Grimsley was identified during a federal investigation as a Signature Pharmacy customer who had received human growth hormone. After a raid on his home, Grimsley has cooperated with federal investegators. Grimsley indicated to investegators that he was referred to a Florida anti-aging clinic by former teammate David Segui.
José Guillén In a November 2007 article, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Guillén had received numerous shipments of human growth hormone, testosterone, nandrolone, stanozolol, clomiphene, Novarel (a brand of hCG) and syringes between 2002 and 2005 from a Florida anti-aging clinic. According to the article, at least one of Guillén's prescriptions was issued by the same unlicensed dentist that prescribed HGH to Paul Byrd. Guillén met with the Commissioner's Office regarding this situation, and Commissioner Bud Selig suspended Guillén for the first 15 days of the 2008 season. Guillén has since appealed his suspension.
Jerry Hairston, Jr. A DEA investigation showed that Hairston received performance-enhancing substances from Applied Pharmacy in Alabama. The prescribing doctor, Ana Maria Santi, later pled guilty to federal and state charges of illegally prescribing performance-enhancing drugs. Records indicate that Hairston received shipments of Genotropin (human growth hormone), human chorionic gonadotropin, and clomiphene citrate in May 2004. Hairston denied these allegations.
Darren Holmes In a March 2007 article, Sports Illustrated reported that Holmes received a shipment of human growth hormone and testosterone in 2003 from a Florida anti-aginc clinic. Holmes admitted purchasing the HGH and stated that while he received the testosterone, he did not order it. Holmes also denied ever using the HGH.
Gary Matthews, Jr. In a February 2007 article, the Albany Times Union reported that Matthews received a shipment of human growth hormone in 2004 from Applied Pharmacy Services of Alabama. According to the article, Matthews received a prescription from a Florida anti-aging clinic. After the article's release, Matthews denied ever using HGH. Chad Allen, during his interview with Mitchell, claimed that he had found unused syringes after Matthews had moved out of Allen's Dallas apartment. Allen lent the apartment to Matthews during the 2004 season. Matthews met with the Commissioner's Office regarding this situation, and Commissioner Bud Selig did not impose any discipline.
John Rocker In a March 2007 article, Sports Illustrated reported that Rocker received two shipments of human growth hormone in 2003 from Applied Pharmacy Services of Alabama. After an initial denial, Rocker acknowledged that he received the HGH under a valid prescription.
Scott Schoeneweis In October 2007, ESPN reported that Schoeneweis received shipments of steroids, including stanozolol and testosterone from Signature Pharmacy from 2003 to 2004. According to the article, Schoeneweis spent $1,160 on the substances. Schoeneweis' prescribing doctor, Ramon Scruggs (who was also named in the allegations surrounding Troy Glaus), had his medical license suspended for making illegal prescriptions. Schoeneweis met with the Commissioner's Office regarding this situation, and Commissioner Bud Selig did not impose any discipline.
Ismael Valdéz In a November 2007 article, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Valdéz received a shipments of human growth hormone, Novarel (a brand of hCG), clomiphene and Arimidex in 2002 from a Florida anti-aging clinic. According to the article, Valdéz received a prescription from the same unlicensed dentist implicated in the situations surrounding Paul Byrd, José Guillén and Matt Williams.
Matt Williams In a November 2007 article, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Williams received shipments of human growth hormone, testosterone, Novarel, clomiphene, nandrolone and syringes in 2002 from a Florida anti-aging clinic. According to the article, Williams received a prescription from the same unlicensed dentist implicated in the situations surrounding Paul Byrd, José Guillén and Ismael Valdéz. According to the article, Williams admitted to being prescribed HGH after undergoing a number of medical tests. He did not address the use or purchase of other steroids and denied knowing the dentist who supplied his prescriptions.
Steve Woodard In a September 2007 article, the New York Daily News reported that Woodard received a shipment of human growth hormone and steroids from a Florida anti-aging clinic. The article did not specify when that shipment occurred.

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