List of Internet Pioneers - The Pioneers - Van Jacobson

Van Jacobson is an American computer scientist, best known for his work on TCP/IP network performance and scaling. His work redesigning TCP/IP's flow control algorithms (Jacobson's algorithm) to better handle congestion is said to have saved the Internet from collapsing in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He is also known for the TCP/IP Header Compression protocol described in RFC 1144: Compressing TCP/IP Headers for Low-Speed Serial Links, popularly known as Van Jacobson TCP/IP Header Compression. He is co-author of several widely used network diagnostic tools, including traceroute, tcpdump, and pathchar. He was a leader in the development of the multicast backbone (MBone) and the multimedia tools vic, vat, and wb.

For his work, Jacobson received the 2001 ACM SIGCOMM Award for Lifetime Achievement, the 2003 IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2006. In 2012, Jacobson was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame by the Internet Society.

Read more about this topic:  List Of Internet Pioneers, The Pioneers

Other articles related to "van jacobson, jacobson":

Van Jacobson TCP/IP Header Compression
... Van Jacobson TCP/IP Header Compression is a data compression protocol described in RFC 1144, specifically designed by Van Jacobson to improve TCP/IP performance over slow serial links ... Van Jacobson compression reduces the normal 40 byte TCP/IP packet headers down to 3-4 bytes for the average case ... Van Jacobson Header Compression (also VJ compression, or just Header Compression) is an option in most versions of PPP ...
Van Jacobson - Awards and Memberships
... For his work, Jacobson received the 2001 ACM SIGCOMM Award for Lifetime Achievement, the 2003 IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award, and was elected to the National Academy ... In 2012, Jacobson was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame by the Internet Society ...

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