List of Indian Folk Dances

List Of Indian Folk Dances

Indian folk and tribal dances are simple dances, and are performed to express joy. Folk and tribal dances are performed for every possible occasion, to celebrate the arrival of seasons, birth of a child, a wedding and festivals. The dances are extremely simple with minimum of steps or movement. The dances burst with verve and vitality. Men and women perform some dances exclusively, while in some performances men and women dance together. On most occasions, the dancers sing themselves, while being accompanied by artists on the instruments. Each form of dance has a specific costume. Most costumes are flamboyant with extensive jewels. While there are numerous ancient folk and tribal dances, many are constantly being improved. The skill and the imagination of the dances influence the performance.

Read more about List Of Indian Folk Dances:  Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Assam, Jharkhand, Goa, Haryana, Veeragaase Dance

Other articles related to "list of indian folk dances, indian, dances, dance":

List Of Indian Folk Dances - Others - North India - Kathak
... Kathak (Hindi कथक, Urdu کتھک) is one of the eight forms of Indian classical dances, originated from northern India ... This dance form traces its origins to the nomadic bards of ancient northern India, known as Kathaks, or story tellers ... dha, ge, na, tirakiTa) or can be a dance variety (ta, thei, tat, ta ta, tigda, digdig and so on) ...

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