List of Important Publications in Philosophy

List Of Important Publications In Philosophy

This is a list of important publications in philosophy, organized by field.

Some reasons why a particular publication might be regarded as important:

  • Topic creator – A publication that created a new topic
  • Breakthrough – A publication that changed scientific knowledge significantly
  • Influence – A publication which has significantly influenced the world or has had a massive impact on the teaching of philosophy.


This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.

Read more about List Of Important Publications In Philosophy:  Further Reading

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