List of Heads of State of Yugoslavia - Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

President of Yugoslavia
Former political post

Standard of the President

Stjepan Mesić
Successor Franjo Tuđman
Dobrica Ćosić
Alija Izetbegović
Kiro Gligorov
Milan Kučan
First officeholder Ivan Ribar
Last officeholder Stjepan Mesić
Office began 29 December 1945
Office ended 5 December 1991

After the German invasion and fragmentation of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, partisans formed the Anti-Fascist Council of National Liberation of Yugoslavia (AVNOJ) in 1942. On 29 November 1943 a AVNOJ conference proclaimed the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia, while negotiations with the royal government in exile continued. After the liberation of Belgrade, the Communist-led government on 29 November 1945 declared King Petar II deposed and proclaimed the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia. In 1963, the state was renamed Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Since 1974, Yugoslavia was headed by a collective presidency, consisting of representatives of the six republics, the two autonomous provinces within Serbia and (until 1988) the President of the League of Communists. The collective was first chaired by Tito, who was President for life. After his death in 1980, one member was annually elected Chairman of the Presidency and acted as head of state. For other leading officials of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, see List of leaders of SFR Yugoslavia.

In 1963 the new Constitution renamed the state as Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and divided the office of the President from the Presidency of the Federal Council, even if the President of the Republic retained the power to preside over the Government when it met, on the French model. In 1974, a new Constitution planned a collective presidency, consisting of representatives of the six republics, the two autonomous provinces within Serbia and (until 1988) the President of the League of Communists, with a Chairman in rotation. Notwithstanding, this constitutional provision was suspended because Tito was declared President for life. After his death in 1980, one member was annually elected President of the Presidency and acted as head of state. For other leading officials of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, see List of leaders of SFR Yugoslavia.

League of Communists of Yugoslavia Socialist Party of Serbia Croatian Democratic Union Democratic Party of Socialists of Montenegro

No. Head of State Lifespan Took office Left office Party Representing Note
President of the Presidency of the People's Assembly
N/A Ivan Ribar 1881–1968 29 December 1945 14 January 1953 Communist Party of Yugoslavia
N/A
League of Communists of Yugoslavia
President
1 Josip Broz Tito 1892–1980 14 January 1953 16 May 1974 League of Communists of Yugoslavia N/A
Presidents of the Presidency
1 Josip Broz Tito 1892–1980 16 May 1974 4 May 1980 League of Communists of Yugoslavia N/A
2 Lazar Koliševski 1914–2000 4 May 1980 15 May 1980 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Macedonia
3 Cvijetin Mijatović 1913–1993 15 May 1980 15 May 1981 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Bosnia and Herzegovina
4 Sergej Kraigher 1914–2001 15 May 1981 15 May 1982 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Slovenia
5 Petar Stambolić 1912–2007 15 May 1982 15 May 1983 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Serbia
6 Mika Špiljak 1916–2007 15 May 1983 15 May 1984 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Croatia
7 Veselin Đuranović 1925–1997 15 May 1984 15 May 1985 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Montenegro
8 Radovan Vlajković 1922–2001 15 May 1985 15 May 1986 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SAP Vojvodina
9 Sinan Hasani 1922–2010 15 May 1986 15 May 1987 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SAP Kosovo
10 Lazar Mojsov 1920–2011 15 May 1987 15 May 1988 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Macedonia
11 Raif Dizdarević 1926– 15 May 1988 15 May 1989 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Bosnia and Herzegovina
12 Janez Drnovšek 1950–2008 15 May 1989 15 May 1990 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SR Slovenia
13 Borisav Jović 1928– 15 May 1990 15 May 1991 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Serbia
(13) Socialist Party of Serbia
N/A Sejdo Bajramović
1927–1994 16 May 1991 30 June 1991 Socialist Party of Serbia AP Kosovo
14 Stjepan Mesić 1934– 30 June 1991 5 December 1991 Croatian Democratic Union Croatia
N/A Branko Kostić
1939– 5 December 1991 15 June 1992 Democratic Party of Socialists of Montenegro Montenegro

Read more about this topic:  List Of Heads Of State Of Yugoslavia

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