List of Feminist Rhetoricians - Sarah Grimke

Sarah Grimke

(1792–1873) Grimke was the southern born daughter of a plantation owner. She was self-educated, and became an attorney and a judge in South Carolina, USA. Her belief in education brought her to teach her personal slave how to read, contrary to the laws of the time. After becoming a Quaker, she fought for women's rights and against slavery.

  • "Letter to Theodore Weld" (1837)

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Other articles related to "grimke, sarah grimke, sarah":

History Of Women In The United States - 1800–1900
... Furthermore, the Grimke sisters from South Carolina (Angelina and Sarah Grimke), received much abuse and ridicule for their abolitionist activity, which ... Furthermore, the Grimke sisters from South Carolina (Angelina and Sarah Grimke), received much abuse and ridicule for their abolitionist activity, which consisted of ... Also, in 1846 Sarah Borginnis resupplied American soldiers with food while they were under fire, and was therefore nicknamed "the heroine of Fort Brown" then-General Zachary Taylor rewarded her with ...
Sarah Grimké - Legacy and Influence
... Sarah Moore Grimké was the author of the first developed public argument for women's equality and she strived to rid the United States of slavery, Christian churches which had ... Sarah Grimke is categorized as not only an abolitionist but also a feminist because she challenged the church that touted their inclusiveness then denied her ... Both Sarah and Angelina both became very involved in the anti-slavery movement, they both published volumes of literature and letters on the topic ...

Famous quotes containing the word grimke:

    [Girls] study under the paralyzing idea that their acquirements cannot be brought into practical use. They may subserve the purposes of promoting individual domestic pleasure and social enjoyment in conversation, but what are they in comparison with the grand stimulation of independence and self- reliance, of the capability of contributing to the comfort and happiness of those whom they love as their own souls?
    —Sarah M. Grimke (1792–1873)