List of Digraphs in Latin Alphabets - T

T

tc⟩ is used for the palatal click /ǂ/ in the orthography of Naro, and to write the affricate /tʃ/ in Sandawe and Hadza.

tg⟩ is used for /tχ/ in the orthography of Naro. In the Catalan spelling, it represents /d͡ʒ/.

th⟩ (see article)

ti⟩, before a vowel, is usually pronounced /sj/ in French.

tj⟩ is used in Norwegian and Faroese words like tjære/tjøra ('tar') for /ç/ (Norwegian) and /tʃ/ (Faroese). In the closely related Swedish alphabet, it represents /ɕ/, as in tjära /ˈɕæːɾa/. It is, or was, also used for /tʃ/ in many Dutch-based orthographies in Indonesia and Surinam. In the transcription of Australian Aboriginal languages such as Warlpiri, Arrernte, and Pitjantjatjara, it represents a postalveolar stop, written /ṯ/ or /ḏ/. This sound is also written ⟨dj⟩, ⟨ty⟩, ⟨dy⟩, ⟨c⟩, or ⟨j⟩. In Catalan spelling it represents /d͡ʒ/

tl⟩ is used in various orthographies for the affricate /tɬ/.

⟩ is used in the transcription of Athabascan languages for a lateral affricate /tɬ/ or /tɬʰ/.

tm⟩ is used in Yélî Dnye of Papua New Guinea for doubly articulated and nasally released /t̪͡pn̪͡m/.

tn⟩ is used for a prestopped nasal /ᵗn/ in the orthography of Arrernte, and for the similar /t̪n̪/ in Yélî Dnye.

tp⟩ is used in Yélî Dnye of Papua New Guinea for doubly articulated /t̪͡p/.

tr⟩ generally represents a sound like a retroflex version of English "ch" in areas of German influence, such as Truk lagoon, now spelled ⟨chuuk⟩. For instance, in the orthography of Malagasy it represents /tʂ/. In southern dialects of Vietnamese, ⟨tr⟩ represents a voiceless retroflex affricate /tʂ/. In the northern dialects, this sound is pronounced, just like what ⟨ch⟩ represents. ⟨Tr⟩ was formerly considered a distinct letter of the Vietnamese alphabet, but today is not.

ts⟩ is used in the orthography of Basque, where it represents an apical voiceless alveolar affricate /t̺s̺/. It contrasts with ⟨tz⟩, which is laminal /t̻s̻/. In the orthography of Hausa, ⟨ts⟩ represents an alveolar ejective fricative /sʼ/ or affricate /tsʼ/), depending on dialect. It is considered a distinct letter, and placed between ⟨t⟩ and ⟨u⟩ in alphabetical order. It is also used in the Catalan spelling for /t͡s/

The Wade-Giles and Yale romanizations of Chinese use ⟨ts⟩ for an unaspirated voiceless alveolar affricate /ts/). Wade-Giles also uses ⟨ts⟩ for the aspirated equivalent /tsʰ/). These are equivalent to Pinyin ⟨z⟩ and ⟨c⟩, respectively. The Hepburn romanization of Japanese uses ⟨ts⟩ for a voiceless alveolar affricate ). In native Japanese words, this sound only occurs before ⟨u⟩, but it may occur before other vowels in loanwords. Other romanization systems write as ⟨tu⟩. ⟨Ts⟩ in the orthography of Tagalog is used for . The sequence ⟨ts⟩ occurs in English, but it has no special function and simply represents a sequence of ⟨t⟩ and ⟨s⟩. It occurs word-initially only in some loanwords, such as tsunami and tsar. Most English-speakers do not pronounce a /t/ in such words and pronounce them as if they were spelled ⟨sunami⟩ and ⟨sar⟩, respectively.

ts̃⟩ was used in the orthography of medieval Basque for a voiceless postalveolar affricate ; this is now represented by ⟨tx⟩.

tt⟩ is used in the orthography of Basque for /c/, and in romanized Kabyle for . In romanized Korean, it represents the fortis sound, and in Haida (Bringhurst orthography) it is ejective /tʼ/.

tw⟩ is used for /tʷ/ in the orthography of Arrernte.

tx⟩ is used in the orthographies of Basque, Catalan, as well as some indigenous languages of South America, for a voiceless postalveolar affricate . In the orthography of Nambikwara it represents a glottalized /tʔ/.

ty⟩ is used in the Hungarian alphabet for /cç/, a voiceless palatal affricate; in Hungarian, digraphs are considered single letters, and acronyms keep them intact. In the orthography of Xhosa, ⟨ty⟩ represents . In that of Shona, it represents . In the transcription of Australian Aboriginal languages such as Warlpiri, Arrernte, and Pitjantjatjara, it represents a postalveolar stop, either voiceless or voiced . (This sound is also written ⟨tj⟩, ⟨dj⟩, ⟨dy⟩, ⟨c⟩, and ⟨j⟩).

tz⟩ is used in the orthographies of Basque and German for the voiceless alveolar affricate ). In Basque, this sound is laminal and contrasts with the apical affricate represented by ⟨ts⟩. It is also used in Catalan to represent the voiced alveolar affricate /d͡z/.

Read more about this topic:  List Of Digraphs In Latin Alphabets

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