List of Covered Bridges in Vermont

Below is a list of covered bridges in Vermont. There are just over 100 authentic covered bridges in the U.S. state of Vermont, giving the state the highest number of covered bridges per square mile in the United States. A covered bridge is considered authentic not due to its age, but by its construction. An authentic bridge is constructed using trusses rather than other methods such as stringers (a popular choice for non-authentic covered bridges).

Read more about List Of Covered Bridges In Vermont:  List, Destroyed

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List Of Covered Bridges In Vermont - Destroyed
... On August 28, 2011 the Bartonsville Covered Bridge was destroyed by raging river waters during Hurricane Irene and was removed from this list ...

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