List of Closed Railway Stations in Britain: P-R

List Of Closed Railway Stations In Britain: P-R

The list of closed railway stations in Britain includes the following. Year of closure is given if known. Stations reopened as Heritage railways continue to be included in this list and some have been linked. Some stations have been reopened to passenger traffic. Some lines are still in use for freight and mineral traffic.

Closed railway stations in Britain by first letter
A, B, C, D–F, G, H–J, K–L, M–O, P–R, S, T–V, W–Z

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Other articles related to "station, closed, railway":

List Of Closed Railway Stations In Britain: P-R - R - Ry
... Station (Town, unless in station name) Rail company Year closed Ryburgh Great Eastern Railway 1964 Ryder's Hays South Staffordshire Railway 1858 Rye Rye ...

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