Line of Greatest Slope

In topography, the line of greatest slope is a curve following the steepest slope. It is always orthogonal to the contour lines. Mathematically it is determined by the gradient of the height, taken as a potential field, so the lines of greatest slope are analogous to lines of force.

If inertial forces and terrain roughness are set side, a ball rolling down a slope, or water flowing down, will follow the line of greatest slope.

Other articles related to "greatest":

Greatest Fits
... Greatest Fits is a greatest hits album by the industrial band Ministry ... The album was released on June 19, 2001, on Warner Bros ...
I Want You Back - Reception
... Want You Back" ranks number 120 on Rolling Stone's list of the '500 Greatest Songs of All Time' ... It also ranks ninth on Rolling Stone's list of the '100 Greatest Pop Songs since 1963' ... The Daily Telegraph called it "arguably the greatest pop record of all time" ...
SK Brann - Records
... Greatest home victory 11-0 vs ... Vard Haugesund, (25 June 1997) Greatest away victory 9-0 vs ... (5 May 2004) Greatest home loss 0-7 vs ...
Jerry Sadowitz
... In 2007 he was voted the 15th greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups and again in the updated 2010 list as the 33rd greatest stand-up ...

Famous quotes containing the words line of, line and/or greatest:

    As for conforming outwardly, and living your own life inwardly, I do not think much of that. Let not your right hand know what your left hand does in that line of business. It will prove a failure.... It is a greater strain than any soul can long endure. When you get God to pulling one way, and the devil the other, each having his feet well braced,—to say nothing of the conscience sawing transversely,—almost any timber will give way.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Today, the notion of progress in a single line without goal or limit seems perhaps the most parochial notion of a very parochial century.
    Lewis Mumford (1895–1990)

    Put up at the moment of greatest suffering a prayer, not for thy own escape, but for the enfranchisement of some being dear to thee, and the sovereign spirit will accept thy ransom.
    Margaret Fuller (1810–1850)