Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial

Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial is a United States Presidential Memorial, a National Historic Landmark District in present-day Lincoln City, Indiana. It preserves the farm site where Abraham Lincoln lived with his family from 1816 to 1830. During that time, he grew from a 7-year-old boy to a 21-year-old man. His mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, and at least 27 other settlers were buried here in the Pioneer Cemetery. His sister Sarah Lincoln Grigsby was buried in the nearby Little Pigeon Baptist Church cemetery, across the street at Lincoln State Park.

Included in the park is the Lincoln Living Historical Farm. The Lincoln Boyhood Home was named a National Historic Landmark in 1960. In 2005 the site was visited by 147,443 people. On site is a visitors' center, featuring a 15-minute orientation film about Lincoln's time in Indiana, and museum and memorial halls. The site is located about ten minutes off the Interstate 64/U.S. 231 junction and near the new U.S. 231 Route, named the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Parkway in his honor.

Read more about Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial:  Gallery

Other articles related to "lincoln boyhood national memorial, memorial, lincolns, lincoln, boyhood, national, lincoln boyhood":

Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial - Gallery
... Memorial entrance Memorial courtyard The foundation of the Lincolns' cabin Lincoln in Kentucky Lincoln in Indiana Lincoln in Illinois Lincoln in Washington ...
Thymos: Journal Of Boyhood Studies
... Thymos Journal of Boyhood Studies is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 2007 as the fourth of four published by Men's Studies Press and the first worldwide to focus specifically on boys and ... journal devoted to providing an interdisciplinary forum for the critical discussion of boyhood and the dissemination of current research and reflections on boys’ lives to a broad, cross-disciplinary audience of ... parenting boys, son-father relations and the effect on boys of the missing father, boyhood subcultures and sexualities, physical and emotional abuse of boys, portrayal of boys in the media, boys in sports, and the ...
William A. Koch - Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial
... Indiana had for many years worked to build a memorial to the formative years of Abraham Lincoln, who lived in the area around what is now Lincoln City from 1816 to 1830 ... With federal money and national park status, more people would learn about Lincoln's Indiana years, and Koch knew that ... In 1962, Congress approved the creation of the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial, and Bill Koch and his wife, Patricia, were on hand as President John F ...
Boyhood (disambiguation)
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Lincoln Boyhood Home
... Lincoln Boyhood Home could refer to Knob Creek Farm - where Abraham Lincoln lived from 1811-1816 in Larue County, Kentucky Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial - where Abraham Lincoln ...

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