Lilo & Stitch (film Series) - Video Games - Stitch! Video Games

Stitch! Video Games

Disney's Stitch Jam, known in Japan as Stitch! DS: Ohana to Rhythm de Daibouken (スティッチ!DS オハナとリズムで大冒険?, Stitch! DS: A Great Adventure of Ohana and Rhythm), is a musical rhythm video game and the first video game in Stitch! series. It was released in Japan on December 3, 2009, in North America on March 23, 2010 and in Europe on March 26, 2010. Different from past Lilo & Stitch adaptations, Disney's Stitch Jam is a rhythm game. Players can take control of Stitch and friends in variety of missions set in space, out on the seas, and in a variety of areas by touching the notes and exclamation marks. The story happened when Angel was kidnapped by Gantu and Hamsterviel. Stitch has to rescue her by travelling into 10 worlds. Stitch is the main playable character. Angel, Reuben and Felix are unlockable.

Motto! Stitch! DS: Rhythm de Rakugaki Daisakusen ♪ (もっと!スティッチ!DS リズムでラクガキ大作戦♪?) is a rhythm video game and a sequel of Disney's Stitch Jam. It was released in Japan on November 18, 2010. It will be unknown whether this game will be released in North America and Europe.

This game will be the same gameplay as its prequel, Disney's Stitch Jam, and has more new features, characters, and experiments. This game will be a modified engine of its prequel. Players can enjoy the rhythmic action of Stitch, who has a magic microphone that can draw his drawings on the air for decorations and travelling (which resembles and is a parody of Doraemon's secret tool, "Air Crayon"). Players can also dress up characters like Stitch and Angel.

Read more about this topic:  Lilo & Stitch (film Series), Video Games

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