Life Extension Foundation

The Life Extension Foundation (LEF) is a non-profit research-based foundation headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, established by co-founders Saul Kent and William Faloon in 1980. Its primary purpose is to fund research and disseminate information on life extension, preventive medicine, anti-aging and optimal health as well as sports performance, with a focus on hormonal and nutritional supplementation, deriving much of its income from the sale of vitamins and supplements.

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Other articles related to "extension, life, life extension, life extension foundation":

Life Extensionists - History of Life Extension and The Life Extension Movement
... The Conquest Of Aging And The Extension Of Human Life, (ISBN 0-440-36247-4) the first popular book on research to extend human lifespan ... of Florida, to discuss the impact of life extension on the Social Security system ... Saul Kent published The Life Extension Revolution (ISBN 0-688-03580-9) in 1980 and created a nutraceutical firm called the Life Extension Foundation, a non-profit organization ...
Life Extension Foundation - Activities
... The LEF publishes a magazine monthly entitled Life Extension that discusses health research and the use of dietary supplements ... Life Extension has provided financial support to help fund research on cryonics and anti-aging ...

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