Lieutenant - Police Rank

Police Rank

The rank of police lieutenant is used in most police forces in the United States. It is normally roughly equivalent to the British police inspector. A number of city and burgh police forces in Scotland used the rank of lieutenant (and detective lieutenant) from 1812 to 1948, when it was replaced by chief inspector. The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (founded 1871) had the rank of lieutenant between staff sergeant and inspector until 1997. In Australia, Queensland's first police force (founded 1864) had second lieutenants and lieutenants between sergeant and inspector-general. The first Lieutenant of Police, Gabriel Nicolas de La Reynie, was appointed in Paris by Louis XIV on 15 March 1667 to command a reformed police force. He was later elevated to lieutenant-general. There are examples in other countries.

US
Police
Lieutenant
Romanian
Inspector
de poliţie
Indian
Assistant
Superintendent
of Police

Read more about this topic:  Lieutenant

Other articles related to "police rank, police, ranks, rank":

Royal Malaysian Police - Police Rank
... Commissioners Inspector-General of Police (IGP) Deputy Inspector-General of Police (DIG) Commissioner of Police (CP) Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police (SAC ... Sub-inspectors and higher ranks wear their rank insignia on epaulettes on both shoulders ...
Police Rank - Vietnam - Commissioned Officers - Low Rank
... Đại úy Công an - Police Captain Thượng úy Công an - Police First Lieutenant Trung úy Công an - Police Lieutenant Thiếu úy Công an - Police Sub-Lieutenant ...
Police Ranks Of The United Kingdom - Rank Insignia
... Badges of rank are usually worn on the epaulettes ... However, when in formal uniform Sergeants wear their rank insignia on their upper sleeves ... When police tunics had closed collars (not open collars as worn with ties), Constables and Sergeants did not wear epaulettes but had their divisional call number on their collar (hence the ...

Famous quotes containing the words rank and/or police:

    Its whether will ye be a rank robber’s wife,
    Or will ye die by my wee pen knife?

    Its I’ll not be a rank robber’s wife,
    But I’ll rather die by your wee pen knife.

    He ‘s killed this may and he ‘s laid her by,
    For to bear the red rose company.
    Unknown. Babylon; or, The Bonnie Banks o’ Fordie (l. 9–14)

    I guess a career in the police didn’t really prepare you for this, did it?
    Bob Hunt (b. 1951)