Library and Information Science Access Midwest Program

Library and Information Science Access Midwest Program (LAMP) is an Institute of Museum and Library Services funded regional network of academic libraries and information science schools working on promoting careers in library and information science. The program looks for promising undergraduate students at its member institutions to participate in activities and events designed to increase their awareness of the profession. The program then provides financial and mentoring support for their graduate studies at one of the member schools. LAMP specifically seeks to encourage the participation of students from statistically and historically underrepresented populations in LIS.

Famous quotes containing the words library and, access, program, information, library and/or science:

    With sighs more lunar than bronchial,
    Howbeit eluding fallopian diagnosis,
    She simpers into the tribal library and reads
    That Keats died of tuberculosis . . .
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    The nature of women’s oppression is unique: women are oppressed as women, regardless of class or race; some women have access to significant wealth, but that wealth does not signify power; women are to be found everywhere, but own or control no appreciable territory; women live with those who oppress them, sleep with them, have their children—we are tangled, hopelessly it seems, in the gut of the machinery and way of life which is ruinous to us.
    Andrea Dworkin (b. 1946)

    If Los Angeles has been called “the capital of crackpots” and “the metropolis of isms,” the native Angeleno can not fairly attribute all of the city’s idiosyncrasies to the newcomer—at least not so long as he consults the crystal ball for guidance in his business dealings and his wife goes shopping downtown in beach pajamas.
    —For the State of California, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    The family circle has widened. The worldpool of information fathered by the electric media—movies, Telstar, flight—far surpasses any possible influence mom and dad can now bring to bear. Character no longer is shaped by only two earnest, fumbling experts. Now all the world’s a sage.
    Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

    With sighs more lunar than bronchial,
    Howbeit eluding fallopian diagnosis,
    She simpers into the tribal library and reads
    That Keats died of tuberculosis . . .
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    There is more religion in men’s science than there is science in their religion.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)