Leith

Leith ( /ˈliːθ/ LEETH; Scottish Gaelic: Lìte) is a district and former municipal burgh to the north of the city of Edinburgh at the mouth of the Water of Leith in Scotland. It has long been regarded as Edinburgh's port. It lies on the south shore of the Firth of Forth, in the unitary local authority of the City of Edinburgh.

First referred to in the charter authorising the construction of Holyrood Abbey, Leith officially became Edinburgh's port in 1329 when Robert I transferred control to the magistrates and citizens of Edinburgh. It remains a busy port, handling over 1.5 million tonnes of cargo a year.

Read more about LeithSouth Leith V. North Leith, History, Traditional Industries, Geography, Churches, Culture and Community, Famous People From Leith

Other articles related to "leith":

Leith School Of Art
... Leith School of Art (LSA) is an independent art college in Edinburgh, Scotland, providing tertiary education in art and design ... LSA is located in the Leith area of Edinburgh, in the former converted Norwegian Seamen's Church, originally built by Scottish architect James Simpson and Danish architect Johan Schroder in 1868 ... LSA has been sited in the former Norwegian Seamen's Church in Leith since its conception ...
Leith FM
98.8 Castle FM (formerly Leith FM) City of license Edinburgh, Scotland Broadcast area Edinburgh Branding Community radio for Edinburgh Frequency 98.8MHz FM ... Leith FM aimed to strengthen the community spirit and the identity of Leith ...
Leith, Ontario
... The unincorporated village of Leith, named after Leith, Scotland, is located on the eastern shore of the Owen Sound, an inlet (sound) on the south shore of Georgian Bay on Lake Huron ... Leith was established on the Telfer Creek where it empties into the sound ... A superior harbour in the city of Owen Sound eventually led to the total demise of Leith as a commercial port ...
Leith Walk - Buildings
... The remnants of Leith Central Station still exist at the Foot of the Walk ... The City Limits Bar, formerly the Boundary Bar, stands on the old dividing line of Leith and Edinburgh ... Prior to 1920, when Leith and Edinburgh merged, it was necessary to use both entrance doors because Leith and Edinburgh magistrates set different licensing rules ...