Leira (Forgotten Realms) - Publication History - Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition (1989-1999)

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition (1989-1999)

Leira was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990), the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet, and Faiths & Avatars (1996). Her clergy was further detailed in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996).

Her role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).

Her relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).


Read more about this topic:  Leira (Forgotten Realms), Publication History

Other related articles:

Monsters Of Spelljammer - Neogi - Publication History - Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd Edition (1989-1999)
... The neogi, the great old master neogi, and the neogi reaver appear in the Monstrous Manual (1993) ... The neogi was detailed in Dragon #214 (February 1995), in the "Ecology of the Neogi" ...

Famous quotes containing the words edition, advanced, dungeons and/or dragons:

    Books have their destinies like men. And their fates, as made by generations of readers, are very different from the destinies foreseen for them by their authors. Gulliver’s Travels, with a minimum of expurgation, has become a children’s book; a new illustrated edition is produced every Christmas. That’s what comes of saying profound things about humanity in terms of a fairy story.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    I saw my lady weep,
    And Sorrow proud to be advanced so
    In those fair eyes where all perfections keep.
    Her face was full of woe;

    But such a woe, believe me, as wins more hearts
    Than Mirth can do with her enticing parts.
    —Unknown. I Saw My Lady Weep (l. 1–6)

    In dark places and dungeons the preacher’s words might perhaps strike root and grow, but not in broad daylight in any part of the world that I know.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Hermann and Humbert are alike only in the sense that two dragons painted by the same artist at different periods of his life resemble each other. Both are neurotic scoundrels, yet there is a green lane in Paradise where Humbert is permitted to wander at dusk once a year; but Hell shall never parole Hermann.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)