Leeward Point Field

Some articles on point, field, points, leeward point field:

46th Infantry Regiment (United States) - Coat of Arms
... a Roman numeral “X” of the first superimposed on a Roman sword in scabbard palewise point down Or fimbriated of the field ... eradicated Gules a spear issuant from base of the first charged on the point with a fleur-de-lis of the second and enfiled by a castle tower Sable masoned of the first charged with a lion rampant Argent ... Motto VICTORY’S POINT ...
45X90 Points
... The 45X90 points are the four points on earth which are halfway between the geographical poles, the equator, the Prime Meridian, and the 180th meridian ... The most well-known and frequently visited such point is 45°0′0″N 90°0′0″W / 45°N 90°W / 45 -90 in the town of Rietbrock ... in use of personal GPS devices, the sign was amended to clarify that the actual 45x90 point is actually approximately 1063 feet (324 m) away in a field behind the sign the location ...
Guantanamo Bay Naval Base - Airfields
... There are two airfields within the base, Leeward Point Field and McCalla Field ... Leeward Point Field is the active military airfield, with the ICAO code MUGM and IATA code NBW ... McCalla Field was designated as the auxiliary landing field in 1970 ...
Geography Of Nigeria - Extreme Points
... This is a list of the extreme points of Nigeria, the points that are farther north, south, east or west than any other location ... Northern-most point - unnamed location on the border with Niger immediately north-west of the town of Chadawa, Sokoto State ... Eastern-most point - unnamed location on the border with Cameroon immediately east of the village of Munyego, Borno State ...
Écarté - Scoring
... One point is scored by the dealer by dealing the king face up as the eleventh card ... One point is scored by marking the king of trumps in a hand before the first card is played ... One point is scored by the player winning the most tricks ...

Famous quotes containing the words field and/or point:

    The planter, who is Man sent out into the field to gather food, is seldom cheered by any idea of the true dignity of his ministry. He sees his bushel and his cart, and nothing beyond, and sinks into the farmer, instead of Man on the farm.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Mildred Pierce: You look down on me because I work for a living, don’t you? You always have. All right, I work. I cook food and sell it and make a profit on it, which, I might point out, you’re not too proud to share with me.
    Monte Beragon: Yes, I take money from you, Mildred. But not enough to make me like kitchens or cooks. They smell of grease.
    Mildred Pierce: I don’t notice you shrinking away from a fifty- dollar bill because it smells of grease.
    Ranald MacDougall (1915–1973)