LED-backlit LCD Display

An LED-backlit LCD display is a flat panel display which uses LED backlighting instead of the cold cathode fluorescent (CCFL) backlighting used by most other LCDs. LED-backlit LCD TVs use the same TFT LCD (thin film transistor liquid crystal display) technologies as CCFL-backlit LCD TVs. Picture quality is primarily based on TFT LCD technology, independent of backlight type. While not an LED display, a television using this display is called an “LED TV” by some manufacturers and suppliers. In the UK, the Advertising Standards Authority has made it clear in correspondence that it does not object to the use of the term “LED TV”, but requires it to be explained in advertising.

Three types of LED may be used:

  • White-edge LEDs around the rim of the screen, using a special diffusion panel to spread the light evenly behind the screen (the most common use)
  • LED array behind the screen, whose brightness is not controlled individually
  • Dynamic “local dimming” array of LEDs, controlled individually (or in clusters) to achieve a modulated backlight pattern

Read more about LED-backlit LCD Display:  Comparison With CCFL Backlit Displays, Technology

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LED-backlit LCD Display - Technology - Backlight-dimming Flicker
... sensitive to flicker, this may cause discomfort and eyestrain (similar to the flicker of CRT displays at lower refresh rates) ... If the hand appears blurry, the display either has a continuously-illuminated backlight or is operating at a frequency too high to perceive ... Flicker can be reduced (or eliminated) by setting the display to full brightness, although this degrades image quality and increases power consumption ...

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