Learned Word Pairs

Some articles on word, learned word pairs, learned, pairs:

Partial Transliteration
... A source word can be transliterated by first identifying all the applicable prefix and suffix segments based on the letters in the source word ... A partial transliteration will also include some unmapped letters of the source word, namely those letters between the end of the prefix and the beginning of the suffix ... particular combination of characters in the source word ...
Sleep And Learning - Increased Learning
... A study was conducted where the subjects learned word pairs, and the results showed that sleep not only prevents the decay of memory, but also actively fixates declarative memories (Ellenbogen et al ... Two of the groups learned word pairs, then either slept or stayed awake, and were tested again ... did the same thing, except they also learned interference pairs right before being retested to try to disrupt the previously learned word pairs ...
Yana (Buddhism) - Nomenclature, Etymology and Orthography
... The word came to be extended to refer to any means used to ease or speed travel hence such meanings as "vehicle", "carriage", "vessel", "wagon", "ship", and so on ... is often used as a preferred translation as the word that provides the least in the way of presuppositions about the mode of travel ... In spiritual uses, the word yāna acquires many metaphorical meanings, discussed below ...
Qalam
... The word derives from the Greek word κάλαμος, meaning reed ... In modern Arabic, Persian, Turkish and Kurdish, the word simply means "pen" or "pencil", while in Hindi and Urdu, the word solely means "pen" ...
Nickname - Etymology
... The compound word ekename, literally meaning "additional name", was attested as early as 1303 ... This word was derived from the Old English phrase eaca "an increase", related to eacian "to increase" ... has changed, the pronunciation and meaning of the word have remained relatively stable ever since ...

Famous quotes containing the words learned and/or word:

    Of Merlin wise I learned a song,—
    Sing it low, or sing it loud,
    It is mightier than the strong,
    And punishes the proud.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Have mercy, little pillow,
    stay mute and uncaring,
    hear not one word of disaster!
    Stay close, little sour feather,
    little fellow full of salt.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)