Lauderdale - Origins of Name

Origins of Name

The valley is said to take its name from the principal town of Lauderdale, the Royal Burgh of Lauder, The town is said to derive its name from the ancient family of the same name. The name of the river between 1124 and 1165 was spelt Leder and Ledre, whilst the name of the town has always been spelt Lauueder, Lawedir, Laudre, Lawder, Lawedere, Lauueder, &c. In a charter of William the Lion (1165 - 1214) both Lauueder and Lauuederdale are mentioned, as is Loweder in another document of the same reign.

Dail is said to be Norse for valley. Lauder parish, or Lauderdale proper, extended to 58 square miles (150 km2) in 1845.

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