Last Judgment (disambiguation)

The Last Judgment is the judgment by God of every human who ever lived in Abrahamic eschatology.

Last Judgment or Last Judgement may also refer to a variety of creative works, such as, chronologically:

  • The Last Judgment, a tympanum by Giselbertus
  • Crucifixion and Last Judgement diptych, Jan van Eyck
  • The Last Judgment (Angelico), a painting by Fra Angelico
  • The Last Judgment (Rogier van der Weyden), a triptych by Rogier van der Weyden
  • The Last Judgment (Memling), a triptych attributed to Hans Memling
  • The Last Judgment (Bosch triptych), a triptych by Hieronymus Bosch
  • The Last Judgment (Bosch triptych fragment), a triptych by Hieronymus Bosch
  • The Last Judgment (Michelangelo), a fresco by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel
  • A Vision of the Last Judgment, a painting by William Blake
  • The Last Judgement (1961 film), an Italian-language comedy film

Other articles related to "judgment":

Judgment Day (2006)
... JudgmentDay (2006) was the eighth annual JudgmentDay professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) ...
Gibson V Manchester City Council - Judgment - House of Lords
... “ Lord Justice Geoffrey Lane in a dissenting judgment which for my part I find convincing, adopted the conventional approach ...
Apocalypse Of Zephaniah - Theology
... It clearly distinguishes between the personal judgmentoccurring immediately after death and the final judgmentby the Lord ... Judgmentis based only on the balance between good deeds and sins during the whole of life, indicating that the book was influenced by Pharisaism ... Souls enter bliss or punishment immediately after the first judgment while waiting for the Lord's coming, but the intercession of the saints makes it possible that, for some, punishment may not be definitive ...
Judgment
... Judgement (or judgment) is the evaluation of evidence in the making of a decision ... The term has four distinct uses Informal - Opinions expressed as facts ...

Famous quotes containing the word judgment:

    To my judgment your highness is not entertained with that ceremonious affection as you were wont.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)