Languages of The United States - Sign Languages - American Sign Language - Hawaii Pidgin Sign Language

Hawaii Pidgin Sign Language (named after Hawaiian Pidgin English, but not itself a pidgin) is moribund.

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Hawaii Pidgin Sign Language

Hawaii Pidgin Sign Language is a sign language used in Hawaii. Now largely supplanted by American Sign Language, it is almost extinct and is used only by a few elderly people, who are bilingual in ASL. The language is named for the oral language Hawaii Pidgin and is not itself a pidgin.

Sign language
  • List of sign languages
  • List by number of signers
By region
Sign languages by region
Australia
  • Australia: Auslan, Warlpiri, Australian Aboriginal
  • Hawaii Pidgin
  • New Zealand
  • Solomon Islands: Rennellese
Asia
  • Chinese
  • Filipino
  • Indonesia: Indonesian, Kata Kolok (Benkala, Balinese)
  • Indo-Pakistani
  • Israel: Al-Sayyid Bedouin, Israeli
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Malaysia: Malaysian, Penang, Selangor
  • Mongolian
  • Nepal: Ghandruk, Jhankot, Jumla, Nepalese
  • Persian
  • Saudi Arabia: Saudi
  • Singapore
  • Sri Lankan
  • Taiwanese
  • Thailand: Ban Khor, Thai
  • Vietnamese
Africa
  • Algerian
  • Ghana: Adamorobe
  • Kenyan
  • Mali: Tebul
  • Nigeria: Bura, Hausa
  • Senegal: Mbour
  • South African
  • Tanzanian
  • Ugandan
  • Zambian
Europe
  • Armenian
  • Austrian
  • Belgium: Flemish
  • British
  • Croatian
  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • Estonian
  • Finnish
  • France: Lyons, French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Hungarian
  • Icelandic
  • Irish
  • Italian
  • Kosovar
  • Lithuanian
  • Macedonian
  • Northern Ireland
  • Norwegian
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Russian
  • Slovenian
  • Spain: Catalan, Spanish, Valencian
  • Swedish
  • Swiss
  • Turkish
North America
  • Canada: Maritime, Providence Island, Quebec, Inuit
  • Mexico: Mayan, Mexican, Tijuana
  • United States: American, Plains Indian, Plateau
South America
  • Argentine
  • Bolivian
  • Brasil: Brazilian, Ka'apor
  • Chilean
  • Colombian
  • Ecuadorian
  • Guatemalan: Guatemalan, Mayan
  • Honduras
  • Nicaraguan
  • Peruvian
  • Salvadoran
  • Venezuelan
International
  • BANZSL
  • International Sign (Gestuno)
  • Makaton
  • Monastic
Language families
  • Australian Aboriginal (List)
  • British (List)
  • Danish (List)
  • French (List)
  • German (List)
  • Japanese (List)
  • Swedish (List)
  • Isolates (List)
American Sign Language
  • Grammar
  • Idioms
  • Literature
  • Profanity
  • CHCI chimpanzee center (Washoe, Loulis)
Extinct sign languages
  • Martha's Vineyard
  • Old French
  • Old Kent
  • Rennellese (nearly)
  • Maritime (nearly)
Linguistics
  • Cherology
  • Grammar (ASL)
  • Handshape
  • Mouthing
Fingerspelling
  • American
  • British (two-handed)
  • Catalan
  • Chilean
  • French
  • Irish
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Polish
  • Russian
  • Serbo-Croatian
  • Spanish
Writing
  • ASL-phabet
  • Hamburg Notation System
  • SignWriting
  • Stokoe notation
Language contact
  • Contact sign
  • Initialized sign
  • Manually Coded English
  • Manually Coded Malay
  • Mouthing
  • Paget Gorman Sign System
  • Bilingual–bicultural education
Media
  • Films (list)
  • Television programs (list)
Persons
  • Jabbar Baghtcheban
  • Johanna Berglind
  • Pär Aron Borg
  • Roger Fouts
  • Robert J. Hoffmeister
  • William Stokoe
Organisations
  • Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada
  • International Center on Deafness and the Arts
  • Mimics and Gesture Theatre
  • ASL Rose
Miscellaneous
  • Baby sign language
  • Hand signaling (open outcry)
  • Legal recognition
  • Tactile signing
  • Tic-tac (betting)
^a Sign-language names reflect the region of origin. Sign languages are not related to a the local oral language. For example, French Sign Language originated in France, but is not related to French.

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