Languages of Scotland - Celtic Languages - Brythonic Languages

Brythonic Languages

None of the Brythonic languages of Scotland survive to the modern day, though they have been reconstructed to a degree.

British may have been spoken in southern Scotland in Roman times and earlier.

The Cumbric language was spoken in the Hen Ogledd which included the Kingdom of Strathclyde, as well as in Cumbria, in northern England. It probably became extinct in the 11th century.

The main legacy of these languages has been Scotland's toponymy, e.g. names such as Aberdeen, Tranent and Ochiltree.

There are also many Brythonic influences on Scottish Gaelic. Scottish Gaelic contains a number of apparently P-Celtic loanwords, but as there is a far greater overlap in terms of Celtic vocabulary, than with English, it is not always possible to disentangle P and Q Celtic words. However some common words such as monadh = Welsh mynydd Cumbric *monidh are particularly evident. Often the Brythonic influence on Scots Gaelic is indicated by considering the Irish Gaelic usage which is not likely to have been influenced so much by Brythonic. In particular, the word srath (Anglicised as "Strath") is a native Goidelic word, but its usage appears to have been modified by the Brythonic cognate ystrad whose meaning is slightly different.

Read more about this topic:  Languages Of Scotland, Celtic Languages

Other articles related to "brythonic languages, brythonic, languages, language":

Brythonic Languages - Remnants in England, Scotland and Ireland - Brythonic Effect On The Goidelic Languages
... more notable, but less well known, are the many Brythonic influences on Scottish Gaelic ... Often the Brythonic influence on Scots Gaelic is indicated by considering the Irish Gaelic usage which is not likely to have been influenced so much by Brythonic ... as "Strath") is a native Goidelic word, but its usage appears to have been modified by the Brythonic cognate ystrad whose meaning is slightly different ...
Britain (placename) - Pre-Roman Period - Language Considerations
... valid for the historical changes of languages, must be valid for the Celtic languages as well ... A proto-Celtic language therefore existed that is, a language, the ancestor of a family defined by a set of shared innovations, or features not possessed by the parent, Proto-Indo-European ... Due to the fragmentary knowledge of some Celtic languages and the continual discovery of new information, no agreement has been reached as to what they are, a paradox ...
Insular Celtic Languages - Insular Celtic Hypothesis
... The "Insular Celtic hypothesis" is a theory that the Brythonic and Goidelic languages evolved together in those islands, having a common ancestor more recent ... and Schrijver 1995) point to shared innovations among Insular Celtic languages, including inflected prepositions, shared use of certain verbal particles, VSO word order, and the differentiation of ... They assert that a partition that lumps the Brythonic languages and Gaulish (P-Celtic) on one side and the Goidelic languages with Celtiberian (Q-Celtic ...

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