Krama

A krama (Khmer: ក្រមារ) is a sturdy traditional Cambodian garment with many uses, including as a scarf, bandanna, to carry children, to cover the face, and for decorative purposes. It is worn by men, women and children, and can be fairly ornate, though most typical kramas contain a gingham pattern of some sort, and traditionally come in either red or blue. It is the national symbol too. It can be used, when folded as a hammock, worn on neck and many other uses.

A closely related garment is known in Thailand as pha khao ma (ผ้าขาวม้า), where is worn in the Isan region by locals and ethnic Khmers.

Other articles related to "krama":

Bokator
... A krama (scarf) is folded around their waist and blue and red silk cords called sangvar day are tied around the combatants head and biceps ... Pradal serey is a more condensed fighting system which uses a few of the basic (white krama) punching, elbow, kicking and kneeing techniques and is free of animal styles ... The krama shows the fighter’s level of expertise ...
Banyumasan Language - Politeness
... Krama is the polite and formal style ... In Banyumasan region, Madya and Krama styles are rarely used, usually towards a stranger who is assumed to come from the eastern area of Java (wetanan) such as Yogyakarta, Surakarta etc ...
Sulukan Texts
... Instead it is a mixture of high Javanese (krama), literary Javanese and Kawi ... be relaxed, allowing the poet to choose a ngoko, krama, krama inggil or even Kawi version of a word to fit the metre in use, creating juxtapositions of speech levels unthinkable in normal ...
Cambodian Clothing - Tops - Krama
... Cambodians traditionally wear a checkered scarf called a krama ... The krama has been a symbol of Cambodian dress since the first century reign of Preah Bath Hun Tean, although it is unclear exactly when the krama became fashionable in the streets ... The krama is one trait that distinguishes the Khmer from their Thai, Vietnamese, and Laotian neighbors ...