Knowledge Capital

Knowledge capital is a concept which asserts that ideas have intrinsic value which can be shared and leveraged within and between organizations. Knowledge capital connotes that sharing skills and information is a means of sharing power. Knowledge capital is the know how that results from the experience, information, knowledge, learning, and skills of the employees or individual of an organization or group. Of all the factors of production, knowledge capital creates the longest lasting competitive advantage. It may consist entirely of technical information (as in chemical and electronics industries) or may reside in the actual experience or skills acquired by the individuals (as in construction and steel industries). Knowledge capital is an essential component of human capital. Knowledge capital at large can be a strong vision, strategic information on market and business model, networks, talent, supply chain, innovation and creativity. There is also knowledge liability, the unknown concerning future business models, lack of knowledge on product-service, on human potential, on governance and supply chain. The balance between knowledge capital and knowledge liability equals knowledge equity. Knowledge equity plus emotional equity equals immaterial value of the company (goodwill).

Famous quotes containing the words capital and/or knowledge:

    No wealth can buy the requisite leisure, freedom, and independence which are the capital in this profession. It comes only by the grace of God. It requires a direct dispensation from Heaven to become a walker. You must be born into the family of the Walkers. Ambulator nascitur, non fit.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    “It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda;” or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties and humour are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language.
    Jane Austen (1775–1817)