Kentucky River

The Kentucky River is a tributary of the Ohio River, 260 miles (418 km) long, in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The river and its tributaries drain much of the central region of the state, with its upper course passing through the coal-mining regions of the Cumberland Mountains, and its lower course passing through the Bluegrass region in the north central part of the state. Its watershed encompasses about 7,000 square miles (18,000 km2). It supplies drinking water to about one-sixth of the population of the state.

The river is no longer navigable above Lock 4 at Frankfort. Concrete bulkheads have been poured behind the upper lock gates of Locks 5-14 to strengthen the weakest link in the dam structures. All 14 dams are now under the management of the state-run Kentucky River Authority. The primary importance of the locks today is to maintain a pool that allows the city of Lexington to draw its drinking water from the river. Despite the fact that the Lexington area receives well over 40 inches (1,000 mm) of precipitation annually, the limestone, karst geology of that area means that surprisingly little natural surface water is found in the region.

Beattyville, Irvine, Richmond, Lancaster, Nicholasville, Harrodsburg, Wilmore, Versailles, Lawrenceburg, and Frankfort also draw water from the river for their municipal water supplies. It is estimated that over 700,000 people depend on the river for water.

Read more about Kentucky RiverDescription, Recreation

Other articles related to "kentucky, kentucky river":

Bluegrass Region
... The Bluegrass Region is a geographic region in the state of Kentucky, United States ... The name "Kentucky" itself means "meadow lands" in several different Indian languages and was specifically applied to this region, only becoming a name for the entire state ... The Kentucky Bluegrass is bounded on the east by the Cumberland Plateau, with the Pottsville Escarpment forming the boundary ...
Kentucky River - Recreation
... The largest goldeye ever taken in the state of Kentucky (2 lbs.64 oz.) was caught in the Kentucky River ...
Western Theater Of The American Revolutionary War - 1782 – "The Year of Blood"
... In Kentucky, the Americans went on the defensive while Caldwell, Elliott, and McKee with their Indian allies prepared a major offensive ... from Boonsborough past Estill's Station along the Kentucky River ... Following orders, Captain Estill reached the Kentucky River a few miles below the mouth of Station Camp Creek and camped that night at Sweet Lick, now known as Estill Springs ...
Peter Hackett - Estill's Station and The Battle of Little Mountain
... It was one of the best known forts of Kentucky ... had raided from Boonesborough past Estill's Station along the Kentucky River ... Following orders, Captain Estill reached the Kentucky River a few miles below the mouth of Station Camp Creek and camped that night at Sweet Lick, now known as Estill Springs ...
Thomas Todd - Death and Legacy
... Todd's remains are reinterred at historic Frankfort Cemetery, overlooking the Kentucky River and the capitol of Kentucky ... substantial real property, particularly in Frankfort, Kentucky ... He was a charter member of the Kentucky River Company, the first business formed to promote Kentucky waterway navigation ...

Famous quotes containing the words river and/or kentucky:

    Every incident connected with the breaking up of the rivers and ponds and the settling of the weather is particularly interesting to us who live in a climate of so great extremes. When the warmer days come, they who dwell near the river hear the ice crack at night with a startling whoop as loud as artillery, as if its icy fetters were rent from end to end, and within a few days see it rapidly going out. So the alligator comes out of the mud with quakings of the earth.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The head must bow, and the back will have to bend,
    Wherever the darkey may go;
    A few more days, and the trouble all will end,
    In the field where the sugar-canes grow.
    A few more days for to tote the weary load,—
    No matter, ‘t will never be light;
    A few more days till we totter on the road:—
    Then my old Kentucky home, good-night!
    Stephen Collins Foster (1826–1884)