Kenley Railway Station - Station Buildings and History

Station Buildings and History

The station was originally opened on 5 August 1856 as Coulsdon Station by the Caterham Railway.

Soon after in November 1856 the station was renamed as Kenley Station.

On Platform 2 stands a gabled Grade II listed building station house in the "Old English style of Domestic Architecture" (architect: Richard Whittall) and similar to the original building at Caterham. This was the original station building which housed a small waiting room for passengers and the original ticket office. In 1899 when the Caterham line was made double-track, a new brick Ticket Office was built on the opposite Platform at road level, and the original building became the Station Master's House. The station house was sold to a private owner in 2007.

The original SER timber-built waiting shelter on Platform 2 was demolished in more recent times due to disrepair and has been replaced with a small modern waiting shelter with lighting.

The booking hall underwent minor ceiling refurbishments and a re-paint in 2010.

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