Kawaii - History - Cute Handwriting

Cute Handwriting

The rise of cuteness in Japanese culture emerged in the 1970s as part of a new style of writing. Many teenage girls began to write laterally using mechanical pencils. These pencils produced very fine lines, as opposed to traditional Japanese writing that varied in thickness and was vertical. Also, the girls would write in big, round characters and they added little pictures to their writing, such as hearts, stars, smiley faces, and letters of the Latin alphabet.

These pictures would be inserted randomly and made the writing very hard to read. As a result, this writing style caused a lot of controversy and was banned in many schools. During the 1980s, however, this new "cute" writing was adopted by magazines and comics and was put onto packaging and advertising.

From 1984–1986, Kazuma Yamane 山根一眞 (Yamane Kazuma ?) studied the development of cute handwriting, which he called Anomalous Female Teenage Handwriting, in depth. This type of cute Japanese handwriting has also been called: marui ji (丸い字?), meaning "round writing", koneko ji (小猫字?), meaning "kitten writing", manga ji (漫画字?), meaning "comic writing", and burikko ji (鰤子字?), meaning "fake-child writing". Although it was commonly thought that the writing style was something that teenagers had picked up from comics, he found that teenagers had come up with the style themselves, as part of an underground movement.

Read more about this topic:  Kawaii, History

Other articles related to "cute handwriting, cute, handwriting":

Kawaii/Archive 2 - History - Cute Handwriting
... During the 1980s, however, this new "cute" writing was adopted by magazines and comics and was put onto packaging and advertising ... From 1984–1986, Kazuma Yamane 山根一眞 (Yamane Kazuma ?) studied the development of cute handwriting, which he called Anomalous Female Teenage ... This type of cute Japanese handwriting has also been called marui ji (丸い字?), meaning "round writing", koneko ji (小猫字?), meaning "kitten ...

Famous quotes containing the words handwriting and/or cute:

    Poets don’t draw. They unravel their handwriting and then tie it up again, but differently.
    Jean Cocteau (1889–1963)

    When our kids are young, many of us rush out to buy a cute little baby book to record the meaningful events of our young child’s life...But I’ve often thought there should be a second book, one with room to record the moral milestones of our child’s lives. There might be space to record dates she first shared or showed compassion or befriended a new student or thought of sending Grandma a get-well card or told the truth despite its cost.
    Fred G. Gosman (20th century)