Kansas City (Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller Song)

Kansas City (Jerry Leiber And Mike Stoller Song)

"Kansas City" is a rhythm and blues song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in 1952. First recorded by Little Willie Littlefield the same year, the song later became a #1 hit when it was recorded by Wilbert Harrison in 1959. "Kansas City" became one of Leiber and Stoller's "most recorded tunes, with more than three hundred versions," with several appearing in the R&B and pop record charts.

Read more about Kansas City (Jerry Leiber And Mike Stoller Song):  Original Song, Wilbert Harrison Version, The Beatles Version, Other Versions, Recognition and Influence

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Kansas City (Jerry Leiber And Mike Stoller Song) - Recognition and Influence
... In 2001, Harrison's "Kansas City" received a Grammy Hall of Fame Award and it is included on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's list of the "500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll." In 2005, Kansas City adopted "Kansas City" as its official song, dedicating "Goin' to Kansas City Plaza" in the historic 18th and Vine Jazz district ... Due to redevelopment, the "12th Street and Vine" intersection mentioned in the song no longer exists, but a park roughly in the shape of a grand piano and with a path in the shape of a treble clef exists at the former location, marked by a commemorative plaque ...

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