Jeph Loeb - Early Life

Early Life

Jeph Loeb grew up in Stamford, Connecticut. He began collecting comic books during the summer of 1970.

His later stepfather was a vice-president at Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, where Jeph met one of his mentors and greatest influences in comic book writing, the writer Elliot Maggin. Jeph however attended Columbia University. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts and a Master's degree in Film. His instructors included Paul Schrader.

Read more about this topic:  Jeph Loeb

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