Jem (TV Series) - Plot

Plot

The series revolves around Jem the mysterious lead singer and front-woman of the rock group "Jem and the Holograms". She is also Jerrica Benton, owner and manager of Starlight Music. Jerrica adopts this persona with the help of a holographic computer, known as Synergy, which was built by Jerrica's father to be "the ultimate audio-visual entertainment synthesizer" and is bequeathed to her after his death. Jerrica is able to command Synergy to project "the Jem hologram" over herself by means of the remote micro-projectors in her earrings, thus disguising her features and clothing enabling her to assume the Jem persona. While disguised as Jem, Jerrica is able to move freely without restrictions and on several occasions other people have been in direct physical contact with her without disrupting the holographic projection. Jem, through the use of her earrings, is also able to project holograms around her and uses this ability throughout the series to avoid danger and provide special effects for the performances of her group.

Jem's group consists of Kimber Benton, Jerrica's younger sister, keyboardist, and main songwriter for the band; Aja Leith, guitarist; and Shana Elmsford, who plays the synth drums. Aja and Shana are also childhood friends and adopted foster sisters of Jerrica and Kimber, having lived with Benton family since they were young. Shana briefly leaves the group to pursue a career in fashion, at which point a new character, Carmen "Raya" Alonso, is introduced as her replacement. The Holograms are aware of Jem's secret identity and the existence of Synergy when the series begins while Raya is made aware unintentionally shortly before joining the group.

The Holograms have two rival bands, "The Misfits" and "The Stingers". The Misfits are composed of petulant rich girl Pizzazz (real name Phyllis Gabor) and her cohorts: no-nonsense Roxy (Roxanne Pelligrini) and kind-hearted, sensitive keytar player Stormer (Mary Phillips). They are joined later by the manipulative British saxophone player Jetta (Sheila Burns). The Stingers appear at the start of the third season when they hit town and shake things up for both groups becoming co-owners of "Stinger Sound" with Eric Raymond. The Stingers are composed of egotistical lead singer Riot (Rory Llewelyn), guitarist/con artist Rapture (Phoebe Ashe), and keyboardist Minx (Ingrid Kruger).

Episodes of the series frequently revolve around Jerrica's efforts to keep her two identities separate, protect Synergy from those who might exploit the holographic technology, and support the twelve foster children known as the "Starlight Girls" who live with her and the Holograms. The Misfits frequently attempt to upstage Jem and the Holograms's endeavors, often nearly resulting in physical harm or death to members of the group. This rivalry is encouraged and manipulated by their manager and central villain in the series, Eric Raymond, former half-owner of Starlight Music who runs Misfits Music (later Stinger Sound).

During the series Eric Raymond constantly plots to become owner of Starlight Music and get revenge on Jem and the Holograms for losing control of the company. Jerrica also deals with a complex and emotionally draining faux love triangle involving her alter identity, Jem, and Rio Pacheco, longtime boyfriend of Jerrica. Rio romantically pursues both women not knowing they are one and the same. Later in the series, Jem is also romantically sought after by Riot, the lead singer of the The Stingers, who becomes infatuated with her, adding further complications to her relationships.

In the final episode of the series, the Misfits and Jem declare a truce when Ba Nee, one of the most troubled foster girls in Starlight House, was claimed by her long-lost father, found by Jem and the Holograms with the help of Riot's father, whose relationship with Riot is mended with the help of Jem.

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